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Posts Tagged ‘POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS’

Grass Cutting, Delinquency Goals and Modern Marketing

January 27th, 2014 No comments

Tony,

Just wanted to leave a quick note about the educational seminar you spoke at regarding “Modern Marketing.” I brought a few community managers along for your presentation…it was a real eye opener for them and me. While we take pride in the fact that our managers and staff maintain their communities and do a good job in collecting site rent, there is more to being successful than cutting grass and meeting the delinquency goals. The days when our customers came to us bringing their homes into our communities are long gone. If we can implement just a few of the ideas from your presentation it will make a huge difference how we will be able to attract potential customers to purchase homes and live in our communities.

I will certainly bring more of my community managers along if you will be speaking again at the 2015 Louisville Home Show.

continental-communities-logo.jpgRegards,
Ted Gross
Theodore M. Gross
Operations Manager
Continental Communities, LLC

An MH Industry Turn Around Plan, Part II

November 16th, 2011 No comments

An MH Industry Turn Around Plan, Part II

 
In my previous article, I explored the potential benefits of an alliance that included not only industry players, but the involvement of the end user – the homeowner. Regardless of the geographical location and cultural differences in this country, affordable housing is a necessity. Whether a consumer is interested in purchasing a manufactured home on land or renting a site (and/or home) in a manufactured home land-lease community, the end result is the same; occupancy of a manufactured home.
 
Like an uncoordinated kid who accepts being chosen last for a sports team, the manufactured housing industry has all too often settled for being considered the less than optimal choice for consumers. At some point, that uncoordinated kid is going to learn the rules, receive instruction from coaches, gain support from teammates, and develops the skills and passion for success at the game. This hypothetical player is going to seek any available resources – from physical fitness and honing skills to setting personal goals and overcoming obstacles – in order to improve positioning. Obviously, the kid is not on this journey alone – coaches, teammates, parents, and fans play an integral role in turning the “last choice” into the first round pick.
 
In a similar manner, the MH Alliance is taking a holistic approach to providing solutions to the manufactured housing industry. One of the biggest hurdles is gaining support from all industry players. The MH Industry is highly segmented – manufacturing, retail, communities, suppliers, finance and insurance, government entities, etc – all hold separate paradigms. More time may be spent by some blaming the other segments for the industry downturn than is spent pulling together and taking action to reverse the trend. The concept of working together to identify and implement sustainable solutions may thus be overshadowed by the reluctance to change and move beyond one's comfort zone.
 
Sports teams recognize that the weakest link can be transformed into the strongest point through the right drills and effort. Therefore, the team takes a holistic approach by identifying specific problem areas and identifying solutions to increase the level of strength by improving the weakest link. The team members recognize each individual’s contribution and the value that it adds to the team’s performance. The MH Alliance is a collective venue that gives balanced value to every player on the team. The strategy is based on breaking down the walls of segmentation to form a team with a unified approach to problem solving. The only “favored children” ought to be the consumers – the manufactured home owners! – of the Industry's products and services.
 
Using a systematic approach, problems are identified and a collaborative effort is used to develop strategies and solutions. The MH Alliance can benefit manufacturers by distinguishing them as a valid and credible source of a much needed product. Quality control issues have been hammered in the media and public opinion. Industry professionals are well aware that manufacturers are held accountable for quality standards. However, the general public – POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS – are not privy to the same information. Consumer awareness and education is a necessary component for image change, yet the current individualized strategies are all too often ineffective. A more unified effort therefor is a must.
 
Information about manufactured homes are usually gleaned from internet searches or a visit to a retail sales center. Manufacturer participation would be linked to current homeowners through the MH Alliance. Not only would the linkage provide access to potential consumers, it would also improve accountability and provide transparency.
 
Manufactured home land-lease communities, MH Retailers and others would also benefit from the Alliance. Let's look at a quick example.
 
Unemployment, foreclosure, and divorce rates are at all time highs in this country. The commonality between the three is that the actions produce a greater need for affordable homes and rental units. Part of the consumer’s resistance to MH Communities (MHC) is the negative stigmatization that is derived from a lack of consistency among owners or managers. One MHC may require yard maintenance requirements and a neat home site with enforced rules while the other allows a goat to eat the grass or you can see barking dog chained to the steps or a tree. The carrot of access to marketing dollars can be a tool for the MH Alliance to involve community owners and encouraging a set of standards will move the choice far beyond the “trailer park” and “mobile home” mentality. Furthermore, by targeting and driving 1-2 star customers to 1-2 star locations, and driving 4-5 star prospects to 4-5 star locations, consumers will find the 'right lifestyle choice' for their needs, wants and budgets.
 
The same can be done with “street retailers” sales centers. We have all seen the state of the art sales centers with HUD Code and modular homes that look like or are ground set, with great landscaping, furnishings, etc. Such 4-5 star retailers should be the ones to see the 4-5 star customers. Those retailers who have 1-2 star locations will have the 1-2 star clientele driven to their sales centers.
In marketing, one goal is always to match the right product and service with the right buyer. One of the good points that the MH Alliance plan offers is that it will avoid marketing disconnects. This will result in more closed business.
 
A key point to remember is the MH Alliance is more than just marketing or image building. So while this article has focused on that aspect, it is important to remember that issues such as better exit strategies for lenders and home owners, improved financing and much more are a part of the mix. Perhaps we can look at those aspects in a future column. # #
 
Links to comments from Industry Professionals who have participated in an MH Alliance/Phoenix Project GoToMeeting small group webinar.
 
 
(Editor’s Note: All links in this article and some edits were provided by MHProNews.com for context to Ms. Tyler’s article. It is good to recall that Ms. Tyler's perspective includes years of MH Retailing and MH home ownership.)
Lisa Tyler, MBA
Marketing Instructor
Walden University
Planning a doctoral dissertation on manufactured home marketing and image.