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Posts Tagged ‘personal property’

“A Home Is a Home” Conversation Starter

August 5th, 2014 No comments

From time to time, it is healthy to have a conversation about the best way we can move forward in a changing world, and in doing so, think through some potential long term goals and aspirations. If we do not at least have those conversations and think these sorts of ideas through, then we are guaranteed that nothing changes.

What follows are simply conversation starters based on my personal observations, no more and no less. They represent no more than my own thoughts.

To quote the American political philosopher, Robert Nozick, “My thoughts do not aim for your assent – just place them alongside your own reflections for a while.” In that spirit, I would offer the following ideas for our industry in Virginia:

Elimination of titles for manufactured homes — While we have been quite successful in cleaning up titling in Virginia, we should have a conversation about the continued long-term need for titles for manufactured homes. We sell homes, not cars, and as such, we should think about how to find a way to convey ownership and perfect personal property security interests in a way that reflects that fact, and in doing so, simplify the process for manufactured homes that are sold as real property. To be sure, doing this would require a viable alternative method of securing personal property interests in manufactured homes. Without such an alternative, elimination of vehicle titles for manufactured homes cannot happen.

Elimination of zoning discrimination against manufactured housing — We need to think about ways to eliminate zoning discrimination against manufactured housing in Virginia. A home is a home.

Being clear about what makes us who we are — We need to be clear that we are simply a mode of construction, just like our site-built friends and our colleagues in the apartment industry. Things beyond that distinction do not define us, and we should not let them. We are not a niche or boutique industry. We are no different than our site-built friends. We are not better, nor are we worse. We build homes, many times in a more efficient manner than many of our competitors. We sell those homes. We lease those homes and the land they are on. That is no more and no less than anyone else in the housing industry.

Embracing our diversity — We should embrace the diversity that characterizes various forms of factory built housing, and in doing so, make sure that we do not allow regulators and others to play us all off against one another. We all should support equity in zoning (a home is a home); all of our homes are well-built. We should, however, also be open about the various styles of construction and what distinguishes them.

Positioning ourselves for a changing development patterns — We should have a conversation about how we position ourselves in a nation that is becoming more urban and suburban and less rural with each passing day. For example, one trend in redevelopment is the use of mixed -use, mixed-income planned unit developments. Our homes (both manufactured and modular) offer the perfect solution for a number of the residential components of these types of neighborhoods at a cost per-square-foot and at a level of quality that allows us to compete favorably with our site-built competitors. But we need to make sure we have the right regulatory and marketing framework in place.

Again, these are just conversation starters. Nothing more. Nothing less. As always, I welcome your thoughts. ##

tyler-craddock-executive-director-virginia-manufactured-and-modular-housing-associationBy Tyler Craddock, Executive Director, VAMMA.

(Editor's note: while this first appeared in VAMMA's publication, the suggestion was made that this has value well beyond their borders. Conversations are needed in the industry, this has some important topics to consider! Published here with Tyler's expressed permission.)  

What More Can We Accomplish After This Year’s Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI) Congress and Expo?

May 13th, 2014 No comments

Like many others, I attended the 2014 National Congress & Expo two weeks ago in Las Vegas. I also chose to attend the National Communities Council Spring Forum held all day Tuesday prior to the opening reception. There were some exceptional programs! The attendance was very high according to reports from MHI. While there was an eye brow-raiser (or two…) on the agenda, off-agenda items that were pretty interesting and overall the Spring NCC Forum and MHI's Congress and Expo featured seminars with speakers focused on current industry topics and issues. Numerous vendors on hand shared their services, displayed their products and provided opportunities for deal making.

What should not come as a surprise was the number of new individuals who attended the Congress.

Many professionals from all facets of the housing, finance and investment sectors were on hand to listen and learn about the manufactured housing industry. This is another great indication on the positive future for the industry.

Today, there is something in the neighborhood of Two (2) Billion Dollars chasing the manufactured housing industry! That's Billion with a capital B!

Those dollars may or may not be invested in our sector; only time will tell. What we need to realize is that there is capital willing to invest and grow in manufactured housing. With new capital much can change, improve and set the stage for a brighter future of the industry.

Yet, even with the large amount of new capital looking to invest in the industry, manufactured housing will still be a very small piece of the roughly One (1) Trillion Dollar annual U.S. housing market.

The questions I continue to ponder are;

  • what can we do to grow the manufactured housing industry’s share of the overall housing industry?

  • How do we get to the root of the obstacles that continue to impede the MH Industry’s growth?

Flying home after Congress and Expo, those nagging questions bugged me. Below is a thought that came to mind that may provide a profitable starting point.

Why not host an – August 2014? – organizational networking/deal making opportunity event that is Trans-Associational?

Why not consider a location near a fine newer MHC property that breaks the stereotypes – such as Saddlebrook Farms in Grayslake, IL – where the potential for new development could better be understood by those who only know the 1 or 2 star MH properties? Would love to hear suggestions on other possible sites that fill the bill.

That property would also feature great looking, residential style product that is ground set, so this would shatter the 'mobile home' image for potential investors who only know the entry level product.

As you can see, I am not suggesting replacing any current event, such as the upcoming MHI annual meeting, NCC Fall Leadership Forum or other association or industry functions.

Rather I am suggesting something totally fresh and different.

Let’s bring the stakeholders and potential investors to the table at the same time with professional facilitation and the opportunity to participate.

The focus of the meeting would be how to get those multi-billions moving ahead, as well as advance the MH Industry as a larger and viable part of the overall housing market.

What makes this concept different than other current programs is that interested parties are invited regardless of current relationship issues or biases. Bringing goal and solution oriented individuals from differing backgrounds, all committed to growing the manufactured housing industry could be groundbreaking.

Please do not misunderstand; while I'd like to be involved, I am not volunteering to take the lead in this event due to my current business obligations. I am putting the idea out in this public forum for discussion.

The way this gets done is for

  • commercial real estate brokers and appraisers,
  • commercial RE lenders and brokers,
  • MH finance companies (personal property and Mortgage lenders),
  • Any – or all – HUD Code manufactured housing and modular builders,
  • developers
  • Suppliers and other service vendors

to pay for the costs of the meeting, mixers and main meals.

Pick a place that is nice clean convention location, and keep the entry fee really low.

Let's put an asterisks next to this one. What if we make it easy for the hundreds (or thousands?) of owners of MHCs who are looking to exit due to age, health or other reasons to come at a pre-event day to discuss their properties face to face with those who may want to buy them?

Might this be a good way to facilitate the capture of more of that circling capital which would also facilitate the improvement of languishing communities and the sales of more homes in them?

There also ought to be an ability for the event organizers to bar this or that person or group at will, so that the Ishbel Dickens/NMHOA or Industry naysayers don't get in. That keeps this focused on business and solutions.

Just think about the number of organizations who would want to take part in an event of this nature. Here are a few who I believe would join the effort.

rick-rand-industry-voices-mhpronews-com

There probably are others who should be included on this list. These are the organizations that came to my mind while thinking about who the stakeholders are in the future of the MH Industry.

One more critical point. Let's tackle the creation of a vibrant, efficient resale market for manufactured homes. This is absolutely critical for the future of our industry, the benefit of our residents and lenders as well as our homes' broader acceptance.

By being trans-associational, this could also prove to be fertile ground for meeting with and recruiting new members.

As to a target date, based on the interest being shown about the industry, sometime in the near term would be better than delaying. By doing it in the summer, a successful meeting could position the 2015 trade shows for dovetailing with this concept.

The location must be close to a major airport so that there is easy access to the event. As noted, having some newer and older MH communities nearby would be beneficial so that participants can take a charter actually view the new homes and better understand the true breadth of the MH product and variety of community lifestyles.

I believe that an event like this will assist in not only promoting the Manufactured Housing Industry but also could be a catalyst for additional new capital investment and future financing opportunities.

We must not lose sight of a key goal of the meeting; how to advance the MH Industry as a larger and viable part of the overall housing market.

Please feel free to comment below or email me with your thoughts. The future of the MH Industry is ours to create. ##

rRck RandRick Rand is the president of Great Value Homes, and has been involved in small and large scale MHC operations. You can contact him at:
Richard J. Rand, President, Great Value Homes, Inc.. 9458 N. Fairway Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53217-1321,

414-352-3855
414-352-3631(fax)
414-870-9000(cell),
RickRand@gvhinc.net

Putting the Qualified Mortgage Dilemma in Perspective

July 19th, 2012 4 comments

Ronnie Richards MHProNewsThe Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was signed into law by President Obama on July 21, 2010. The Act implements financial reform sponsored by the Democratically controlled 111th United States Congress and the Obama administration. Passed as a response to the late-2000s recession, the Act is bringing the most significant changes to financial regulation in the United States since the reform that followed the Great Depression. The biggest threat to the manufactured housing industry and the Texas Manufactured Housing Association is the impact the new more stringent regulations might have on loans under $50,000.

I did some research using sales data available on the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs Manufactured Housing Division (TDHCA MH) web site and the Statistical Surveys data my company subscribes to and it confirmed my concerns. According to TDHCA MH data, single section homes comprised 60% of new home retail sales for the five months ending May 31, 2012.

When I ran a retail selling price analysis in Statistical Surveys for the three months ending March 31, 2012, the most recent period available, I found that 92% of all single sections sold at retail had a selling price of $55,000 or less and 7% of multi-sections fell into that bracket. There were 1097 new home single section sales with lender liens titled as personal property (chattel loans) during the first five months of 2012.

Assuming 93% fall below a $55,000 sales price which with a 10% down payment would mean a loan balance of $50,000 or less, 1020 single section homes and 71 multi-section homes would be affected by the new regulations. That is 27% of all new HUD Code sales and 52% of all personal property financed sales.

I don’t need to tell you how that could affect our industry.

Just the manufacturer dues revenue which accounts for approximately 75% of TMHA revenue would decline by 27%. There are sixteen active HUD Code plants in Texas and if you assume a workforce of 150 at each of these plants a reduction in production could result in 648 Texans losing their jobs and that doesn’t even take into consideration the 55 active licensed out of state plants.

Texas currently has 747 active Retailer license holders and 1002 active licensed Retail Sales license holders. Based on a 27% reduction in sales due to the impact of the new regulation, we could see a reduction by 202 retail outlets and 271 retail sales licensees respectively. In total not even counting lenders, contractors, suppliers and so forth we might face a loss of 1120 jobs in our core member group.

The other impact which is difficult to measure is the new regulations could add significant barriers to affordable home ownership with no alternative housing options. There could be a an annual reduction in new HUD Code manufactured housing sales in Texas of 2650 units based on the current run rate if loans of $50,000 and less are highly regulated. Current manufactured home owners wishing to sell their home will find it very difficult to get financing for their buyers under the new regulations.

We can’t let this happen. MHI, TMHA and other interested parties are taking steps to educate those writing the regulations at the federal level about our industry and its unique financing model. The outcome is not guaranteed but at least we are attempting to influence the rule writing and not just sitting on the sidelines.

If you want to learn more about this and a broad range of other industry topics you should consider attending the Annual Convention of the Texas Manufactured Housing Association in Houston August 20th and 21st. You can learn more about all the business building and informational seminars linked at this site. It’s easy to register online at TexasMHA.com or call the TMHA office at 512-459-1221. All are welcome. ##

Ronnie Richards MHProNewsRonnie Richards is the Chairman of the Texas Manufactured Housing Association and Vice President of Marketing for American Homestar Corporation headquartered in League City, Texas.

If you don’t go forward, you’re not going to go anywhere

May 20th, 2011 2 comments

Marty, thanks for your writing.  You are going where no one wants to go, but should.

I (the bank) have been a manufactured housing lender since 1991.  Not a large one, but neither is the bank I work for (Oxford Bank).  I rarely participate or respond to anyone or anything via the internet; however, Marty Lavin’s commentary interested me.  [See The Train To Oblivion, May 16th.]

Mr. Lavin has identified the brutal facts, but not how to fix them.  Further yet, does anybody really want to fix them?  Everybody  seems to have beaten up and worn down.

I have outlived the Greentrees, Consecos and others that felt booking loans at high rates, extended terms, big fees and huge  volumes was the thing to do.

I am still lending but, only to parks that want to “partner” with us.  Everyone hates bankers right now; hopefully, what I have to say doesn’t make it worse.

Below are a few comments and a few things I have learned in my 20+ years of MH lending.  I am probably getting off the path somewhat, but Marty opened the door for some comments from the lenders side:

  • Rates, of course, are higher than an auto loan.  When you loan money for 20 years at a fixed rate for anything, the bank must protect itself for future increases.
  • Anyone who thinks that the bank makes a huge spread on these loans is just plain ignorant.
  • The park owners control the bank’s destiny, losses and expenses.
    Today’s rates are controlled by losses and expenses, not just cost of funds.
  • Bank regulators do not like MH loans or “Trailers” as they say.
  • A manufactured home is considered personal property and sometimes it’s considered real estate.  If someone wants to hang you – it’s real estate.
  • I believe the parks that do their own financing are building a monster.  Let’s hope they retain a large reserve for losses, understand fair housing and Federal and State compliance laws.  I think they should let the bank be the bank.
    Servicing is expensive; it just increased again with the escrow law.
  • Generally, most parks will sell their own inventory over the bank’s repos, even if the bank pays for advertising.  They will switch the buyer to their home.
  • A big part of the banks’ losses are the parks’ profits.
  • Greentree and some other mega lenders were foolish; high rates and big loan fees do not make good loans.  Worse yet, they would finance the fees.
  • It’s the park’s customer until it becomes a repo; then it becomes the bank’s customer.
  • Some parks must feel that the bank guarantees the lot rent since it financed the home.
  • Many park owners are not active enough in their parks and put an underpaid and inexperienced employee in the park manager’s seat.
  • Unfortunately, these things don’t have motors.  Lenders are totally reliant on the parks for help.  With values in the tank, it’s hard to justify moving them.
  • There are still some crooks in this industry: fake down payments, home options that are not really there and straw purchases are still around.
  • The FDIC deems anyone with a credit score of 660 and under a subprime borrower.  This gives the appearance that my portfolio is subprime.
  • Manufactured home loan brokers are very dangerous.

The industry needs to go forward, not backwards.

Find a lender and “partner” with him or her.  Help the bank when they have a repo by assisting them in controlling the loss.  The
bank is paying the park a commission to sell the home; maybe they could even mow the yard for free?  Maybe they could use their maintenance guy to perform cosmetic repairs at cost?  In return, they could benefit from offering financing at reasonable rates and quality delivery.  This isn’t hard stuff.

My bank is still in the business of financing homes, but only for a handful of parks.  These are the parks that have “partnered” with us to get the job done.  Both the parks and the bank are much better off.

My biggest problems at present stem from loans made years ago in park(s) that have been sold to a REIT, portfolio operator or out-of-state investor.  The buyers of these parks figured out that they overpaid and are now increasing lot rents to compensate for their mistake.  This is creating unnecessary repos and they could care less.  # #

Al Cole
Oxford-Bank.com
alcole@oxford-bank.com