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Posts Tagged ‘manufactured home’

Definition of a Manufactured Home

May 13th, 2013 No comments

Tony,

Recalling the important debate you started about defining “manufactured housing,” here is a very good one from of all places, Utah, which just enrolled this bill as law!

Manufactured home" means a transportable factory built housing unit:

127) constructed on or after June 15, 1976, according to the Federal Home Construction and Safety

128) Standards Act of 1974 (HUD Code), in one or more sections, which, in the traveling mode, is

129) eight body feet or more in width or 40 body feet or more in length, or when erected on site, is

130) 400 or more square feet, and which is built on a permanent chassis and designed to be used as a

131) dwelling with or without a permanent foundation when connected to the required utilities, and

132) includes the plumbing, heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems.

Attached below is the first few pages of the law for added context. Feel free to spread the word!

Utah State Legislature H.B. 71 US Official News May 11, 2013 Saturday sent by Rob Coldren.pdf

rob-coldren-posted-on-mhmsm(2).jpgRob Coldren|Senior Partner
HK&C Law
200 Sandpointe, 4th Floor | Santa Ana, CA 92707<
Tel.714-432-8700|Fax.714-546-7457
rcoldren@hkclaw.com|www.hkclaw.com

Manufactured Housing Institute CEO Richard Jennison’s letter to Princeton’s WordNet requesting Definition Correction

April 12th, 2013 No comments

wordnet@princeton.edu 

Research can be valuable and informative if it approaches its subject in a non-biased, factual manner.  Your recent definition of "manufactured home" however immediately casts your research intentions into serious doubt with such prejudicial, outdated, and uninformed terminology.

Official, legal, definitions are available on many state and national government websites and will provide you a more balanced and timely reflection of the state of manufactured homes in 2013.  I request that you update your own definition using one of these, without the insertion of your flawed and outdated misunderstanding of today's manufactured homes.

Should you need any additional assistance in defining manufactured homes, please contact me and I will be happy to provide you with correct information.

Richard JennisonSincerely,
Richard Jennison
President and CEO
Manufactured Housing Institute

(Editor's Note: Dick Jennison's cogent response is published with permission, and is in response to this 'definition' published online by Princeton's WordNet as shown below:

MHProNews thanks MHI's Dick Jennison, Lisa Tyler's (Walden University) heavily documented letter, Georgia Manufactured Housing Association's Jay Hamilton, MHRetailer Jody Anderson and MHC manager James Cook for their published responses to this issue, along with the others who have directly addressed wordnet@princeton.edu to ask them to update their flawed definition of manufactured home. We have word from sources that other efforts will be made to encourage Princeton to update this obvious error.

Until Princeton's Wordnet Team has made a proper update, please take a moment and add your voice to these and other respected industry professionals who have emailed wordnet@princeton.edu asking them to correct their flawed online definition. You could use one of the examples given by others linked above, or write your own, but please do write them.

Our original column that launched this topic on MHProNews is linked here and a different version meant for the public is found here on MHLivingNews) ##

Lisa Tyler – at Walden University – Request for Correction Addressed to Princeton’s WordNet

April 12th, 2013 No comments

Dear Esteemed Princeton Wordnet representative-

 Princeton University is one of the leading educational systems in the country.  The school's reputation reflects the highest levels of academic excellence, prestige, accuracy, and leadership.  Articles written by Princeton educated authors are viewed as the ultimate authority on a variety of topics. In light of the level of confidence placed in Princeton affiliated publications, there is a growing concern in the manufactured housing industry on the Wordnet definition of “manufactured home.”

According to the Google search engine result that cites wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn as the defining source, a manufactured home is “mobile home: a large house trailer that can be connected to utilities and can be parked in one place and used as permanent housing..

Obvious problems exist with this very outdated definition.

It may seem like a cultural vernacular that impacts a small percentage of the population. However, approximately 23 million Americans live in manufactured housing (Wilson, 2012). According to the 2007 American Housing Survey, approximately 8.7 million (6.8%) of the 128 million housing units were manufactured homes (Zhou, 2009). The 2011 American Housing Survey reflects the increase to approximately 9.05 million manufactured housing units.

Comprising the second largest percentage of all housing units in the United States (McCarty, 2010), manufactured housing has been a vital source of affordable housing (Wilson, 2012) and are typical of rural areas (Aman & Yarnal, 2010; Tighe, 2013). Housing experts recognize manufactured housing as the predominant source of unsubsidized, affordable housing for rural homeowners and tenants (Tighe, 2013). Not only does the misnomer influence inaccurate perceptions of the product, it can contribute to the marginalization of a significant population.

There are many peer reviewed works that include definitions available that could be used in place of Wordnet’s outdated version. Following are some examples that you may find useful:

  • Manufactured home: Housing structures produced in factories, then transported to site, and installed on designated lands (Zhou, 2009). Manufactured homes must be constructed to the standards of a uniform nationwide building code known as the HUD code (Dawkins & Koebel, 2010).
  • Mobile home: Slang word for manufactured home. Derived from the original classification of mobile homes as vehicles requiring registration with the Department of Motor Vehicles (Kusenbach, 2009). Prevailing term changed to “manufactured home” in 1981 (Wilson, 2012)

Manufactured homes construction occurs in a factory setting, transported to a dealership in another location to be sold, and eventually placed on site at a third location (Dawkins & Koebel, 2010). The manufactured housing construction process uses similar techniques, materials, and equipment as traditional site homebuilding (Nahmens & Ikuma, 2009). The main differences in the construction processes are location of construction and resources used. Manufactured housing construction takes place on an assembly line in a controlled environment (Nahmens & Ikuma, 2009) while exposure to natural elements determines site built home construction processes. Industrialized construction uses construction crews dedicated to specific processes on the assembly line (Nahmens & Ikuma, 2009), whereas independent contractors complete site built home construction processes at different times.

I hope that enough peer reviewed information has been provided to justify changing Wordnet’s definition of manufactured home. Princeton University and its affiliates greatly influence consumer perceptions of products. The recent economic crisis has resulted in housing changes for many Americans. The need for high quality and affordable housing is a pressing issue that must be resolved. The term “trailer house” was replaced with “mobile home” in the 1950’s (Burkhart, 2010; Wilson, 2012). The 1981 HUD code revision included the adoption of “manufactured home” as the prevailing term (Wilson, 2012). Thirty two years later, Wordnet is still referring to the product using terms such as “trailer house” and “mobile home.”

I respectfully request that the definition be updated to reflect the government and industry recognized term that properly represents the product. In the event that you need further proof to justify requested changes, I have provided a reference list of peer reviewed sources used in this letter.

Lisa TylerSincerely,
Lisa Tyler, DBA (ABD), MBA

References

Aman, D., & Yarnal, B. (2010). Home sweet mobile home? Benefits and challenges of mobile home ownership in rural Pennsylvania.Applied Geography30(1), 84–95. doi:10.10.1016/j.apgeog.2009.09.001

Burkhart, A. (2010, February 5). Bringing manufactured housing into the real estate finance system. Pepperdine Law Review, Forthcoming; Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-06. Retrieved from http://ssrn.com/abstract=1548441

Dawkins, C., & Koebel, C. (2010). Overcoming barriers to placing manufactured housing in metropolitan communities. Journal of the American Planning Association76(1), 73–89. doi:10.1080/01944360903401052

Kusenbach, M. (2009). Salvaging decency: Mobile home residents’ strategies of managing the stigma of “trailer” living. Qualitative Sociology32(4), 399–428. doi:10.1007/s11133-009-9139-z

McCarty, W. (2010). Trailers and trouble? An examination of crime in mobile home communities. Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research12(2), 127. Retrieved from https://atoz-ebsco-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/Customization/Tab/12486?tabId=5371

Nahmens, I., & Ikuma, L. (2009). An empirical examination of the relationship between lean construction and safety in the industrialized housing industry. Lean Construction Journal, 1–12. Retrieved from www.leanconstructionjournal.org

Tighe, J. R. (2013). Responding to the foreclosure crisis in Appalachia: A policy review and survey of housing counselors. Housing Policy Debate23(1), 111–143. doi:10.1080/10511482.2012.751931

Wilson, B. (2012). An examination of electricity consumption patterns in manufactured housing units. Housing Policy Debate22(3), 175–199. doi:10.1080/10511482.2011.648204

Zhou, Y. (2009). Two essays on American housing markets: The determinants of housing value volatility and the ownership decision for manufactured housing (Ph.D dissertation). Ohio State University, Ohio, United States. Retrieved from http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Zhou%20Yu.pdf?osu1243886980

Georgia Manufactured Housing Association’s Executive Director Sounds off on Princeton WordNet’s “Definition” of Manufactured Homes

April 12th, 2013 No comments

(Editor's Note: As with the MH Retailer's letteror the MHC Community manager's letters, linked as shown, this letter below was sent to Princeton's WordNet in response to their flawed definition of manufactured homes as found online and reported in this blog post.)

Princeton WordNet

Good Afternoon,
I have always appreciated the consistency and accuracy of www.wordnet.com but recently I read an industry article concerning your definition of Manufactured Housing. A recent industry article informed me that your definition of "Manufactured Home" is as follows:  "Mobile home: a large house trailer that can be connected to utilities and can be parked in one place and used as permanent housing."

I would certainly like to think someone with the IQ, life experiences, and test scores required to be accepted as a student at Princeton or to gain employment on the prestigious Princeton Faculty could certainly come up with a more comprehensive term for Factory Built Housing or Manufactured Housing. As a matter of fact, I am 100% convinced people of your intelligence can certainly challenge themselves to a higher level of vocabulary development than what you have demonstrated thus far. People like me that have committed their entire adult lives to the success of this industry would be so appreciative.

I will leave you with a few facts. In Georgia where I am located 43% of our residents live in Manufactured Housing. All of our homes are built to the Federal HUD Code, the International Building Code (IBC) or the International Residential Code (IRC). The latter two codes are accepted worldwide. Over 70% of our homes are installed on a permanent foundation and never moved again for the life of the homes. The National Home Builders Association recognizes that our housing has recently been rated by an independent engineering and architectural firm as having an average lifespan of 53 years. That we build homes on a daily basis that exceed 2500 square feet.

Thank you for your consideration,

Jay HamiltonC. Jay Hamilton
Executive Director
Georgia Manufactured Housing Association
199 East Main Street
Forsyth, Georgia 31029
Phone 478-994-0006
Cell 478 394 5114

(Editor's Note: The email address for the WordNet team is: wordnet@princeton.edu please take a few moments and email them, asking them to update their definition of manufactured housing. You can use the example above, the one by Retailer Jody Anderson or by Community Manager James Cook, all of which bring a flavor and punch not found in the original sent by Tony Kovach linked here. Whatever you do, email  wordnet@princeton.edu something you like, to encourage they update their outdated and flawed “definition.“

Another letter to Princeton’s WordNet Team about their Flawed Definition of a “Manufactured Home“

April 11th, 2013 No comments

(Editor's Note: As with the Jody Anderson letter, linked here, this letter from a MH Community Manager is reprinted with permission, and was sent in response to this blog post.)

Princeton WordNet Team.

To whom it may concern,
Far be it from me to take issue with a definition published by such an esteemed institution as yours, I still must.

A recent industry article informed me that your definition of "Manufactured Home" is as follows:

"Mobile home: a large house trailer that can be connected to utilities and can be parked in one place and used as permanent housing."

I am sorry, but referring to modern manufactured homes as a "trailer" or "mobile home" is akin to calling a 2013 Lexus sedan a "horseless carriage" or Princeton as a "school."

It is a disservice to our proud industry who serves as housing for 8% of Americans including the poor, lower-middle class, and even millionaires (at least one in my community).  

The definition belies how far our industry has come in the areas of quality and craftsmanship and subjugates us to the level of redneck/hillbilly shacks.

Thank you for your consideration on this matter.

Respectfully Yours:

james-cook-mhc-manager-ma-posted-industry-voices-mhpronews.comJames Cook,
MHC Property Manager.
Ph (401) 402-0373
Fax (815) 572-5255

(Editor's Note: this is how Princeton's WordNet “definition” appears online in Google:

The email address for the WordNet team is: wordnet@princeton.edu 

Please take a few moments and send them a message of your own, or use a variation on the one MH Retailer Jody Anderson sent, or like the fine one above from MHC manager James Cook, both of which we deem better than the one Tony Kovach sent, linked again here.)

Other messages besides these have been sent to WordNet, but we need more from You and Your MH Circle until Princeton U 'gets the message' and changes their terribly erroneous, so-called definition of a manufactured home. So take a moment now and please send a message to wordnet@princeton.edu. CC latonyk@gmail.com in your message to Wordnet, Thank you! )

Irresponsible Weather reporting by Media and National Weather Service

April 11th, 2013 No comments

Tony,
It's that time of year again for bad weather, and of course, the local news weather reporters, The Weather Channel & the National Weather Service are busy scaring the hell out of Manufactured Home owners and residents with ridiculous 'info' about 'trailers' during storms.

Recently, a new 'weatherman' at a Dallas/Fort Worth station told his audience to just get out of "mobile homes" & other poorly built structures.  He didn't say to go to a shelter, or underground, basically just for people to go outside of their "mobile home."

We need a national campaign to educate media 'Weather' reporters, the National Weather Service, and the like in the mainstream media about two things:

  • Manufactured/mobile homes are not trailers. TRAILERS are travel trailers & aren't tied down.

2. Manufactured homes are anchored & the walls are built to withstand direct force sustained winds of high mph minimum standards set by HUD, meaning its federally regulated.

As you know, the average Manufactured Home goes through a dozen earthquakes and 2 hurricanes just getting from he factory to a dealer's lot!

Can you use your vantage point to forward this message to State & National MH groups to get an organized campaign going to stop all this negative & incorrect publicity?

Thank you.
Frank Woody, Owner
Republic Homes
Weatherford & Early, Texas

p.s. I'll follow up on Jody's letter to the Princeton WordNet team, as well.

Letter to the Princeton University WordNet Team about Manufactured Homes

April 10th, 2013 1 comment

(Editor's Note: This letter is reprinted with permission, and was sent in response to this blog post.)

Word Net Team,

Along with others involved in the manufactured housing industry, I have noticed that an incorrect definition for the term “manufactured home” has been published on the Internet and that the definition originated with your group.

Official, legal, definitions are available on many state and national government websites and I request that you update your own definition using one of these.  Most of these definitions established by Congress or the various state legislatures are similar to one another but if you need to combine some verbiage to accurately inform a national audience I’m sure you will be able to produce such a definition.  I encourage you to take action on this simple “fix” as soon as possible to avoid creating further confusion and misinformation among consumers on the most affordable and tightly regulated housing option in America.

Thank you,

Jody Anderson
President, Timberland Mobile Housing, LLC
1600 N. Timberland Drive
Lufkin, Texas  75901
936-632-4481

(Editor's Note: The email address for the WordNet team is: wordnet@princeton.edu  please consider sending them a message of your own, or use a variation on the one Jody Anderson sent above or that Tony Kovach sent linked again here.)

The 2013 Tunica Manufactured Housing Show was Fantastic!

March 31st, 2013 No comments

What a fantastic turnout for the Tunica Manufactured Housing Show! The optimism of lenders, manufacturers, suppliers, community managers, retailers and association leaders was evident. There was much “buzz” over new innovations in the homes AND the participation of a couple of new retail and wholesale lenders.

I was very impressed by the attendance at the seminars. I overheard a couple of gentlemen discussing how they had been to all of the seminars and gained valuable and useful information that would benefit their respective businesses.

It also seems that manufactured home community management involvement has increased since last year’s show – wonderful news!!!

As the economy continues to slowly recover, consumers will become more aware of the affordable housing options. This shift will help every facet of the industry. More importantly – it will increase consumer awareness and (hopefully) education about the product.

I had the privilege of discussing my dissertation topic with a few fellow Tunica Show attendees. The commonality between the conversations was the need to improve the perception of manufactured housing to accurately reflect the high quality and extreme value the product offers.

Everyone seemed to agree that the biggest challenge was changing the way the general public viewed manufactured homes. While there is no magic cure that will solve issues, having conversations about benefits and challenges can lead to grassroots efforts that spur change. Movement of any kind in the right direction will have a positive impact. After all, our current President achieved his first election through grassroots movements and social media. If seemingly small changes can result in a sea-change of that magnitude, imagine what similar grass roots forward momentum in the manufactured housing industry can do…

One thing I like about the Tunica Show is that you never know who you will run into! I was able to meet “Uncle” Si Robertson from the hit show Duck Dynasty as he was touring the CMH displays. Later that evening (thanks to the awesome folks at CMH), I was able to meet Phil and Miss Kay Robertson AND listen to Phil’s testimony at the CMH Award Banquet & Celebration.

Phil shared that he had toured a manufacturing facility and witnessed outstanding work ethic. Not only did he recognize the value of the product, he appreciated the hard work of every person in the industry.

Talk about a great opportunity to change the consumer perception of manufactured housing! The stars of the most popular television show recognize, understand, and appreciate the product – how about THAT for validation and perception change!

There are lots of positive things happening in the manufactured housing industry. Whether in the developmental phases or getting ready for implementation, there are abundant opportunities for involvement and participation. ##

Lisa Tyler
Walden University
(Editor's Note: Lisa Tyler is a veteran of manufactured housing retail and is currently doing her dissertation en route to her PhD on a topic focused on Manufactured Housing)

(Photo credit: Lisa Tyler (right) with Uncle Si Robertson – left – from Duck Dynasty)

Marking Our Growth Going Into DC

February 20th, 2013 No comments

deanna-fields-mhao-industry-voices-mhpronews-com-100x100-It’s been awhile since I played with the numbers…and it’s been awhile since we’ve seen an increase in shipments.5 years to be exact. So I thought you might like a copy of “Statistically Speaking 2012.” 

MHAO's Director and MHI Certified Representative Doug Gorman from Home-Mart, Inc., in Tulsa and I are headed to D.C. next week to champion our industry in Oklahoma and to rally support from our Congressmen and Senators for some relief on the Dodd-Frank, energy credits, etc., thought I better bring some fresh data!

Oklahoma is currently number 8 in the nation in manufactured home shipments. Here is what our association will be presenting as part of our meeting with legislators.

See this handout full size by downloading the PDF at this link here. ##

 

Deanna Fields
Executive Director
MHAO = Manufactured Housing Association of Oklahoma

NCC Meeting News Update

January 27th, 2013 No comments

National Communities Council Members:

With the growing need for affordable housing combined with the rapidly evolving regulatory environment, lack of homebuyer financing, and other challenges, our industry has tremendous opportunities at the same time it faces significant hurdles. Both MHI and the NCC have experienced a period of major transition, and with our Washington leadership team now firmly in place, I believe the most important step ahead is to develop a vision and action plan for the NCC that provides the foundation to carry us through the next few years of supporting the industry and servicing our membership. In lieu of the NCC business meeting that has been held traditionally in conjunction with the MHI Legislative Conference and Winter Meeting, at the upcoming meeting the NCC Executive Committee will instead hold a closed planning workshop focused on solidifying the NCC’s vision for the future. Our goal will be to define a vision that ensures the NCC supports MHI’s broader legislative advocacy and marketing outreach efforts, provides the range of services most valuable to the variety of constituents we represent, makes interim NCC meetings more productive for all of our members, and expands our membership to add to our resources and strength as the only MHI division representing community owners.

While the traditional NCC meeting will not be held during the upcoming MHI Legislative Conference and Winter Meeting from February 24-26, I strongly encourage all NCC members to attend this important gathering and support MHI’s advocacy efforts. Our industry has an excellent opportunity for expansion as the housing market recovers, but we need unity and alignment to ensure the regulatory and legislative environment supports our goals. The upcoming Legislative Conference in Washington is the best place to contribute by making our collective industry voice heard on Capitol Hill and helping your legislators recognize our industry’s vital role in providing affordable housing.

As just one example of how your voice can make a difference, the recently released CFPB rules will have a significant impact on community owners and operators, and while the industry did not achieve all of its goals for the new rules, MHI and member efforts clearly had an impact.  For example, within the Qualified Mortgage rules, the CFPB did expand the spectrum of loan amounts and has proposed a qualified mortgage exemption within the new category of “smaller creditors.”  Just today, we are learning that it appears all new manufactured homes may be exempt from the new appraisal requirements for higher-risk mortgages.  While information continues to develop, it is critical that we work together in the legislative process to present industry unity and bring positive results.

The regulatory environment will continue to shift rapidly as additional Dodd-Frank and CFPB rules are promulgated and reform efforts are undertaken. These changes and their impact on your business will be central to the upcoming Legislative Conference, and your participation in MHI’s advocacy efforts is vital to ensuring the best result. I look forward to seeing you in Washington and to working with the NCC’s Executive Committee to lay out a vision that leverages our opportunities, responds to our challenges, and supports your success well into the future.

Sincerely,
David

David B. Lentz
Chairman
National Communities Council

(Editor's Note: this memo was originally sent to NCC members by Vice President Jenny Hodge on Tuesday January 15, 2013. It is reprinted here with permission.)