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Posts Tagged ‘grassroots’

MHGrassroots: A Call to Action

June 17th, 2014 No comments

As I sit comfortably in a 737 at 30000 feet coming back from a thought provoking meeting at the MHI Expo in Las Vegas I don't have to go in great detail on how the world has changed since 2001.

From how we fly, how we communicate, and even how we conduct business, it has all changed in ways none of us truly imagined then.

Every day I read more about how a government I have grown up loving, is making changes that contradict the core beliefs and attributes it was built upon. With that said, let's look at a few issues that have faced, primarily as it relates to the manufactured home market in the past 15 years.

In Texas we were asleep at the wheel in 2001 when House Bill 1869 took effect. I was but one of the many independent dealers who were wondering how this could have happened. I even looked Gov. Rick Perry in the eye and told him point blank that this bill would cost Texans jobs and would reduce home order sales, which in turn would force the closing of several fine manufacturing plants.

Unfortunately I and those around me were right. Even though the TMHA through a lot of hard work was able to have this poor piece of legislature repealed in 2003, the damage was already done.

I won't go into the specifics of the law itself, but I will say it was a killer from day one. If you have any questions about it, just Google it. I have heard the experts’ state that 85% of the independents who were in the market at that time were wiped out by this law and the recession that hit us in 2008. And guess what. Those folks are gone, probably never to return again.

So let's take a look at where the train came off the tracks.

We were too late to stop one train simply because we weren’t aware it was heading for the station.

If we want to be successful in the legislative arena we have to stop the bills before they get that close to the tracks. We, the industry as a whole, must be vigilant in being aware of any laws, in every city, county, state and federal arena that could negatively impact not only us, but the people around us.

This means we have to know, and have a relationship with, the people in charge. Governor Perry signed that bill even after I told him the truth. Why? Simple, he didn't know me from Adam. No relationship equals no traction. We have to build those relationships in order for our voices to not only be heard but to be accredited.

How was it fixed? A grassroots effort. From the ground up. TMHA called upon every member….who in turn called on every state senator and state representative to repeal a bad piece of legislation. And it worked! Why? Because the industry stood up as a whole, and worked together for the common good of all. I call this a victory for the good guys.

Let's look at another victory.

Last year I received a phone call from a landlord who was my ‘competitor’ in Plainview, Texas. I use that word competitor only because we are after the same pool of customers. I call him a friend.

Basically this city was in the process of creating a city ordinance which would require an inspection on every rental inside the city once it was vacated by a tenant. Never mind the fact that this would be in direct contradiction to the HUD code on a manufactured home. Every house, apartment, and mobile home would have to be brought back to current code if this law passed.

This would mean thousands of dollars spent to update every unit.

One unintended consequence of this law would have forced the citizens to pay rent in excess of three times the current rate.

Another would have riddled the city with homes to be demolished due to the repair cost being more then the value of the home.

Yet another would have been a mass exodus of good paying tenants to the surrounding communities which didn't have this law.

So how did we stop this calamity before it was passed like Texas House Bill 1869?

We showed up in droves. There was standing room only at every hearing. Meetings with every city official we could get and we killed it before it could even be heard by city council. How? It took one phone call from each of us who took the time to make that call. And another victory ensued.

So what does all this mean to you, the reader?

It's time. It is time to make a difference and make a call of your own.

I know you are busy, but don't blow this one off.

Dodd Frank and the SAFE Act are not going away. So what are you going to do? I am calling not only those of us in the industry, but all of us.

The government doesn't need us, but this country does. We are this country's answer to affordable housing. But if the people can't get financing for that home what good are we to them?

If you don't know who to call that's ok. Call your state association. If you are not a member, sign up. If you are a member, get active. Make a difference. You can. ##

shawn-fuller-d-r-housing-new-deal-texas-industry-voices-manufactured-housing-mhpronews-com-75x75-Shawn Fuller
D & R Housing, LLC.
New Deal, TX 79350

Timely Grassroots Engagement with Congress

August 17th, 2010 No comments

MHARR logoWith Congress in recess and with members back in their districts for the balance of the Summer, now is the best time of the year for industry members to seek out, communicate with – and meet – their federal representatives away from the distractions of Washington, D.C. While MHARR is in regular contact with Congress in Washington, D.C. in order to address and advance issues of importance to both the HUD Code industry and consumers of affordable housing, members of Congress are always anxious to hear directly from their constituents on matters that concern them. This is particularly true leading up to the November 2010 mid-term elections, with the control of Congress hanging in the balance.

As a result, grassroots industry members have an outstanding opportunity over the next few weeks to tell their members of Congress directly about the major challenges that the industry faces in Washington, D.C. in key areas, including private and public financing (i.e., the “Duty to Serve” and FHA Title I), and continuing issues affecting the HUD Title VI program, including the deteriorating status and stature of the Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee (MHCC) and the avoidance of – and non-compliance with – required consensus and rulemaking procedures by program regulators on major regulatory issues, such as the ongoing de facto expansion of in-plant regulation.

The common thread running through all of these issues (and many others), that needs to be constantly reinforced with Congress, is that the difficulties the industry faces in Washington, D.C. do not arise from the lack of good laws. To the contrary, Congress has provided the industry with highly beneficial legislation over the past decade, including the Manufactured Housing Improvement Act of 2000, and the “Duty to Serve” and FHA improvement provisions of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. Instead, much of the difficulty faced by the industry is a consequence of the failure of relevant federal agencies to fully and properly implement these laws in a manner consistent with the intent of Congress. In large part, this occurs because of the comfort level that regulators routinely get from forces within the industry, or outside the industry, or both.

As many in the industry are rapidly recognizing, given the nature of the problem, the solution does not lie in passing more laws that will similarly be ignored or manipulated. Instead – and as MHARR has already begun to explore – ongoing industry engagement with Congress needs to be expanded to include effective congressional oversight of these matters to ensure that the good laws already on the books are respected and properly implemented by federal regulators. With the industry continuing to decline and with regulators’ continuing resistance to the full and proper implementation of these existing laws – which needlessly exclude consumers from the manufactured housing market – Congress needs to be fully engaged in an oversight capacity. And, the best time to embark on such an approach is right now, with one-on-one meetings of industry members with their congressional representatives, at home, in their districts, to be aggressively followed-up in Washington, D.C. by the industry’s national representatives.

Danny D. Ghorbani
Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform
1331 Pennsylvania Ave N.W., Suite 508
Washington, D.C. 20004
Phone: 202/783-4087
Fax: 202/783-4075
Email: mharrdg@aol.com