Action Alert: Don’t Let Lending for New Homes Dry Up on January 1, 2014!

June 12th, 2013 No comments

IN A NUTSHELL: If we do not get legislative changes this year, loans for home buyers could be EVEN LESS available afterJanuary 1, 2014.Yes, it can get even worse if we do nothing. Please help us by doing two things

1. Contact your Member of Congress to express your support for H.R. 1779 (information is below).

2. Please go to cosponsor.gov(http://cosponsor.gov/details/hr1779-113) and express your support for H.R. 1779 (you need to have a Facebook account use cosponsor.gov).

BACKGROUND: We have encouraged VAMMHA members and others who read this to contact members of their Congressional Delegation to ask them to cosponsor H.R. 1779. Members in the 5th District of Virginia are encouraged to contact Congressman Robert Hurt (who has already agreed to cosponsor the bill) to thank him for his support.

Here is what this issue is about: Reps. Stephen Fincher (R-TN), Bennie Thompson (D-MS) and Gary Miller (R-CA) have introduced thePreserving Access to Manufactured Housing Act(H.R. 1779).

The measure would amend provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act that would otherwise curtail the availability of credit needed by those seeking to purchase manufactured housing if action isn't taken..

Specifically, the bill would revise the High-Cost Mortgage triggers for manufactured home loans, and make clarifications to the Loan Originator definition as it applies to manufactured home retailers and salespeople.

These two areas of the law—which are scheduled to become effective January 2014—would substantially reduce lender ability to originate manufactured home loans.

Assistance is needed from VAMMHA members and others within the manufactured housing industry, in contacting their Representatives to request they co-sponsor H.R 1779.

More details are available in thisdetailed issue brief/action alert.

Here is what we need: Please take a moment to contact your House member and ask them to cosponsor H.R. 1779.

To help you out,here is a sample letter that can be faxed or cut and pasted into an email to Congressional offices.

If you need to look up your Member of Congress, please click herehttp://www.house.gov/representatives/find/.

IMPORTANT: Congressman Robert Hurt (5th Congressional District) has agreed to cosponsor this bill. So, if he is your Congressman, instead of using the sample letter, please contact him to thank him for his support.

The following resource information is also available:

Over the coming weeks, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) is expected to introduce companion legislation in the Senate. Additional information will be provided at that time.

Please be sure to share with us any feedback you get from your Member of Congress. Thank you for all that you do to support the factory-built housing industry in Virginia.

tyler-craddock-executive-director-virginia-manufactured-and-modular-housing-associationTyler Craddock, Executive Director
Virginia Manufactured and Modular Housing Association
8413 Patterson Avenue
Richmond, Virginia 23229
Office804.750.2500
Mobile804.980.1172
Fax804.741.3027
Emailtcraddock@vammha.org

Are You Ready to Grow?  Ready to Do What it Takes?

June 7th, 2013 No comments

It’s been a tough decade and more for manufactured housing. Before the residential housing meltdown of 2007-08, manufactured housing had it tough already. Half of the homes the industry produced in 1999 to 2000 have since been repossessed. That devastated those customers but also the flood of repos tanked new home production and the number of factories and retailers plunged.

The challenges we face today are in stark contrast to the assets the industry still possesses—excellent products, land zoned for use by MH and market hardened professionals.

So, how do we take those assets and turn the industry around?

Veteran retailer Mike Evans of Centennial Homes of Aberdeen, SD recently laid out his vision to LA Tony Kovach of MHProNews:

  • Identify opportunities that no one else will pursue or they don’t see. (Are you a general contractor or are you giving your margins away to others?)
  • Set your goals within your values.
  • Determine the strategic and tactical plans needed to capture that opportunity.
  • Develop a business plan that uses the 3 resources business owners and managers have to accomplish the task: Capital, Technology and Human Resources.

My only addition to his list is to expand your resources by identifying others that can be your strategic partners. You don’t need to do it all yourself, but you have to be able to fill in the gap between your capabilities and what is needed.

In talking to members, they have product and customers but lack financing. Yes, Dodd-Frank was a blow to installment sales, but there are other ways to finance purchasers. This is an example of where there is need for networking for new finance sources. Successful members are expanding their business by relentlessly talking to bankers, credit unions, and mortgage brokers. One member said, he finally broke through by just being a pest regarding the opportunity that MH finance can be for a local lender.

The days of faxing a loan application and getting an answer by noon are over and are not coming back. If we have all of the elements to rebound, then we need to do what it takes to make it happen. ##

ross-kinzler-wisconsin-housing-alliance-executive-director-posted-industry-voices-manufactured-housing-professional-news-mhpronews-com-75x75.pngRoss Kinzler
Executive Director
Wisconsin Housing Alliance
608.255.3131 voice
608.255.5595 fax

Hearing Explores Government Role in Multifamily and Health Care Facilities

May 22nd, 2013 No comments

Even though this hearing and the Chairman’s quoted comments arise within the specific context of multifamily housing, they nevertheless are relevant to manufactured home financing as they reflect broader thinking in Congress regarding federal involvement in the housing market

Most particularly, the comments in paragraphs 3 and 4 once again confirms what MHARR has been saying all along with respect the failure of the FHA (via GNMA) and GSEs to provide adequate securitization and secondary market support for manufactured home loans and especially personal property (chattel loans) –i.e., that FHA and the GSEs have fundamentally departed from their original statutory mission of providing access to credit for lower-income borrowers and first-time homebuyers. That departure has harmed the very consumers that these entities were formed to serve, as well as the manufactured housing industry as a provider of affordable homeownership, with both FHA and the GSEs refusing to provide high-volume securitization for manufactured home loans – citing “risk” and “perceptions” without any hard data on the performance of current-day manufactured home loans – when it was the ventures of FHA and the GSEs in the “exotic” and subprime site-built mortgage market that led to the insolvency of the GSEs and now the near-insolvency of FHA.

Consequently, even though the availability of high-volume securitization for manufactured home loans – and especially chattel loans – has the capacity to turn the industry around virtually overnight and provide access to truly affordable homeownership for the lower-income borrowers and first-time homebuyers that these entities were created to serve, they nevertheless cling to discriminatory policies that have severely restricted such lending through the FHA Title I program and effectively excluded such loans from GSE support, notwithstanding the statutory “Duty to Serve” mandate. These baseless policies, moreover, have enabled the domination of the chattel finance market by a handful of companies with either pre-existing access to that restricted securitization or independent financial backing, further harming both consumers and the industry.

As this demonstrates, expanding the availability of chattel loan securitization and support to high volume levels must be a top priority for the industry in Washington, D.C.

Given the focus of the current Administration on providing fairness and increased access to home financing for the lower-income borrowers that FHA and the GSEs were created to serve, the industryhas a window of opportunity in the coming months to take concrete steps to correct these flawed policies and expand the availability of manufactured home financing. ##

MHARR-logo-posted-on-MhProNews-com

 

 

 

 

Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR)

1331 Pennsylvania Ave N.W., Suite 512
Washington, D.C. 20004
Phone: 202/783-4087
Fax: 202/783-4075
Email: MHARRDG@AOL.COM

 

 

 

committee-financial-services-logo-posted-mhpronews-

 

 

 

Press Release

 

For Immediate Release
May 16, 2013

 

Hearing Explores Government Role in Multifamily and Health Care Facilities Mortgage Insurance and Reverse Mortgages

 

WASHINGTON –The Financial Services Housing and Insurance Subcommittee continued its examination of the troubled Federal Housing Administration (FHA) today with a hearing that focused on several of the agency’s programs that operate outside its mission.

This was the subcommittee’s third hearing this year examining FHA and the need to reform the agency.

“FHA runs its operations contrary to the most basic principles of insurance and is nearing insolvency, putting taxpayers at risk of another government bailout,” said Subcommittee Chairman Randy Neugebauer (R-TX). “Members on both sides of the aisle strongly support FHA’s core mission of providing access to credit for lower-income borrowers and first-time homebuyers. There still is a general consensus in favor of strengthening and improving FHA, without risking further taxpayer exposure.”

Today’s hearing examined the mortgage insurance programs the FHA operates for multifamily housing, health care facilities and reverse mortgages – all of which are activities that reach far beyond the agency’s original mission. The FHA’s original mission is to provide mortgage financing opportunities for low-income and first-time homebuyers.

Given that the FHA was designated a “high risk” agency by the Government Accountability Office earlier this year, many wonder whether the FHA can viably carry out its original mission, much less these other programs that are not related to its mission.

In addition to insuring single-family mortgages, the FHA also insures other kinds of mortgages—such as those for multifamily rental housing and health care facilities—through a separate insurance fund called the General Insurance and Special Risk Insurance Fund. While this fund is not projected to incur losses in the near term, many are concerned about the role the FHA plays in the multifamily market and that its policies subject taxpayers to undue risk.

Due to a lack of transparency in the GI/SRI Fund, Congress cannot fully assess the fiscal state of the FHA’s multifamily insurance program.

The FHA also operates an insurance fund for reverse mortgages that enables those aged 62 or older to obtain additional income by borrowing against the equity in their homes. To make these mortgages possible, the reverse mortgage insurance provided by FHA protects lenders from losses due to non-payment.

In recent years, as home prices have fallen, many experts have become concerned about losses in the FHA’s reverse mortgage portfolio. An independent actuarial review released last November estimated that the economic value of the FHA’s reverse mortgage insurance program was negative $2.8 billion.

 

###

Manufactured Housing industry businesses along Shields Boulevard in Oklahoma City are still here and intact, as is MH Association of Oklahoma

May 21st, 2013 No comments

I closed the office early (Tuesday, May 20) so Corlis and I could run home. We have no shelter here at the office. By the grace of God the tornado stopped 3 miles west of my home…I live just east of Stanley Draper Lake where the tornado lifted. So my family, dogs, horses, chickens and dwelling are all safe. My heart and prayers are going out to a lot of my friends who were not so lucky. Bad thing about this is that we can’t get into the zone to help them with their horses, needs, etc.

Thank you for thinking of us Okie’s!

Tony, I was in the process of composing a letter to a reporter from Channel 9 that was bashing the industry and the park, Steelman Estates, that got leveled several days ago. Lance the reporter, said "this is what to expect from a trailer park…you can't recognize anything, when I reported about the Piedmont damage a while back at least you can still see steel frames and partial homes made of brick." What Lance forgot to remember is that the Piedmont disaster leveled homes to the foundation and killed several children taking shelter with their mom in a bathtub in their $300k home. The pond behind the leveled homes was full of lumber. He also is clueless about the high density of a manufactured home community…compared to a rural estate homes on an acre or as in Moore on a city block(s).

Well now Lance is reporting from Moore and now is saying the same thing "you can't recognize anything, homes are leveled."

The park on Sunday was in the direct path of a F4. The homes in Moore yesterday were destroyed by an F4 (might get upgraded to an F5).

Today I decided that I wouldn’t waste any more time on this reporter who obviously likes sensationalism….the media is now focused on Moore and the elementary school. Our hearts and prayers are going out to everyone who lost loved ones and their homes these past several days. ##

manufactured-housing-association-of-oklahoma-logo-posted-on-mhpronews-com.pngDeanna Fields, Executive Director
Manufactured Housing Association of Oklahoma

(Editor's Note: the MHAO office is also on Shield's Boulevard, right off I-240 and near I-35 in Oklahoma City, OK. This is just a short distance from Tuesday's storm path.)

Only In America

May 15th, 2013 9 comments

10) Only in America …could politicians talk about the greed of the rich at a $35,000.00 a plate campaign fund-raising event.

9) Only in America …could people claim that the government still discriminates against black Americans when we have a black President, a black Attorney General, and roughly 18% of the federal workforce is black while only 12% of the population is black.

8) Only in America …could they have had the two people most responsible for our tax code, Timothy Geithner (the head of the Treasury Department) and Charles Rangel (who once ran the Ways and Means Committee), BOTH turn out to be tax cheats who are in favor of higher taxes.

7) Only in America ….can they have terrorists kill people in the name of Allah and have the media primarily react by fretting that Muslims might be harmed by the backlash.

6) Only in America …would they make people who want to legally become American citizens wait for years in their home countries and pay tens of thousands of dollars for the privilege, while they discuss letting anyone who sneaks into the country illegally just 'magically' become American citizens.

5) Only in America …could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as "extremists."

4) Only in America …could you need to present a driver's license to cash a check or buy alcohol, but not to vote.

3) Only in America …could people demand the government investigate whether oil companies are gouging the public because the price of gas went up when the return on equity invested in a major U.S. oil company ( Marathon Oil) is less than half of a company making tennis shoes (Nike).

2) Only in America …could the government collect more tax dollars from the people than any nation in recorded history, still spend a Trillion dollars more than it has per year – for total spending of $7-Million PER MINUTE, and complain that it doesn't have nearly enough money.

1) Only in America …could the rich people – who pay 86% of all income taxes – be accused of not paying their "fair share" by people who don't pay any income taxes at all. ##

Guest Column
Submitted by
Larry Hahn

Definition of a Manufactured Home

May 13th, 2013 No comments

Tony,

Recalling the important debate you started about defining “manufactured housing,” here is a very good one from of all places, Utah, which just enrolled this bill as law!

Manufactured home" means a transportable factory built housing unit:

127) constructed on or after June 15, 1976, according to the Federal Home Construction and Safety

128) Standards Act of 1974 (HUD Code), in one or more sections, which, in the traveling mode, is

129) eight body feet or more in width or 40 body feet or more in length, or when erected on site, is

130) 400 or more square feet, and which is built on a permanent chassis and designed to be used as a

131) dwelling with or without a permanent foundation when connected to the required utilities, and

132) includes the plumbing, heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems.

Attached below is the first few pages of the law for added context. Feel free to spread the word!

Utah State Legislature H.B. 71 US Official News May 11, 2013 Saturday sent by Rob Coldren.pdf

rob-coldren-posted-on-mhmsm(2).jpgRob Coldren|Senior Partner
HK&C Law
200 Sandpointe, 4th Floor | Santa Ana, CA 92707<
Tel.714-432-8700|Fax.714-546-7457
rcoldren@hkclaw.com|www.hkclaw.com

How About a Cup of Coffee?

May 8th, 2013 No comments

a-cup-mhmsm-comHey Tony. Just wanted to write and let you know how much I love reading the COC with… columns. It opens my eyes to see what the true visionaries see AND, as was the case with Sam Landy, it gives me an arsenal of info to go to my boss with.

Case in point: My boss is a shareholder of UMH and respects Sam. However, my boss and I have had some friendly debates. I want to move old homes out and he wants to keep them. Sam referencing the correlation between older homes and vacancy rates was very helpful in convincing my boss to take a second look at my plan for a row of homes that include a recent eviction, a recent force-out and an abandoned home which we should have possession of shortly.

Thanks for your hard work!

(Editor's Note, the writer – who is known to us personally – requested the following – “Feel free to publish my comments anonymously on this one. I know many in our association read MHProNews and know who my boss is. They don't need to know about our 'marital' spats :) ” The same courtesy of publishing a column anonymously has been given by us previously and would be given again to you or others under similar circumstances. The Cup of Coffee interview archives are linked here, and the one referenced about Sam Landy, is linked here.)

Manufactured Housing Institute CEO Richard Jennison’s letter to Princeton’s WordNet requesting Definition Correction

April 12th, 2013 No comments

wordnet@princeton.edu 

Research can be valuable and informative if it approaches its subject in a non-biased, factual manner.  Your recent definition of "manufactured home" however immediately casts your research intentions into serious doubt with such prejudicial, outdated, and uninformed terminology.

Official, legal, definitions are available on many state and national government websites and will provide you a more balanced and timely reflection of the state of manufactured homes in 2013.  I request that you update your own definition using one of these, without the insertion of your flawed and outdated misunderstanding of today's manufactured homes.

Should you need any additional assistance in defining manufactured homes, please contact me and I will be happy to provide you with correct information.

Richard JennisonSincerely,
Richard Jennison
President and CEO
Manufactured Housing Institute

(Editor's Note: Dick Jennison's cogent response is published with permission, and is in response to this 'definition' published online by Princeton's WordNet as shown below:

MHProNews thanks MHI's Dick Jennison, Lisa Tyler's (Walden University) heavily documented letter, Georgia Manufactured Housing Association's Jay Hamilton, MHRetailer Jody Anderson and MHC manager James Cook for their published responses to this issue, along with the others who have directly addressed wordnet@princeton.edu to ask them to update their flawed definition of manufactured home. We have word from sources that other efforts will be made to encourage Princeton to update this obvious error.

Until Princeton's Wordnet Team has made a proper update, please take a moment and add your voice to these and other respected industry professionals who have emailed wordnet@princeton.edu asking them to correct their flawed online definition. You could use one of the examples given by others linked above, or write your own, but please do write them.

Our original column that launched this topic on MHProNews is linked here and a different version meant for the public is found here on MHLivingNews) ##

Lisa Tyler – at Walden University – Request for Correction Addressed to Princeton’s WordNet

April 12th, 2013 No comments

Dear Esteemed Princeton Wordnet representative-

 Princeton University is one of the leading educational systems in the country.  The school's reputation reflects the highest levels of academic excellence, prestige, accuracy, and leadership.  Articles written by Princeton educated authors are viewed as the ultimate authority on a variety of topics. In light of the level of confidence placed in Princeton affiliated publications, there is a growing concern in the manufactured housing industry on the Wordnet definition of “manufactured home.”

According to the Google search engine result that cites wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn as the defining source, a manufactured home is “mobile home: a large house trailer that can be connected to utilities and can be parked in one place and used as permanent housing..

Obvious problems exist with this very outdated definition.

It may seem like a cultural vernacular that impacts a small percentage of the population. However, approximately 23 million Americans live in manufactured housing (Wilson, 2012). According to the 2007 American Housing Survey, approximately 8.7 million (6.8%) of the 128 million housing units were manufactured homes (Zhou, 2009). The 2011 American Housing Survey reflects the increase to approximately 9.05 million manufactured housing units.

Comprising the second largest percentage of all housing units in the United States (McCarty, 2010), manufactured housing has been a vital source of affordable housing (Wilson, 2012) and are typical of rural areas (Aman & Yarnal, 2010; Tighe, 2013). Housing experts recognize manufactured housing as the predominant source of unsubsidized, affordable housing for rural homeowners and tenants (Tighe, 2013). Not only does the misnomer influence inaccurate perceptions of the product, it can contribute to the marginalization of a significant population.

There are many peer reviewed works that include definitions available that could be used in place of Wordnet’s outdated version. Following are some examples that you may find useful:

  • Manufactured home: Housing structures produced in factories, then transported to site, and installed on designated lands (Zhou, 2009). Manufactured homes must be constructed to the standards of a uniform nationwide building code known as the HUD code (Dawkins & Koebel, 2010).
  • Mobile home: Slang word for manufactured home. Derived from the original classification of mobile homes as vehicles requiring registration with the Department of Motor Vehicles (Kusenbach, 2009). Prevailing term changed to “manufactured home” in 1981 (Wilson, 2012)

Manufactured homes construction occurs in a factory setting, transported to a dealership in another location to be sold, and eventually placed on site at a third location (Dawkins & Koebel, 2010). The manufactured housing construction process uses similar techniques, materials, and equipment as traditional site homebuilding (Nahmens & Ikuma, 2009). The main differences in the construction processes are location of construction and resources used. Manufactured housing construction takes place on an assembly line in a controlled environment (Nahmens & Ikuma, 2009) while exposure to natural elements determines site built home construction processes. Industrialized construction uses construction crews dedicated to specific processes on the assembly line (Nahmens & Ikuma, 2009), whereas independent contractors complete site built home construction processes at different times.

I hope that enough peer reviewed information has been provided to justify changing Wordnet’s definition of manufactured home. Princeton University and its affiliates greatly influence consumer perceptions of products. The recent economic crisis has resulted in housing changes for many Americans. The need for high quality and affordable housing is a pressing issue that must be resolved. The term “trailer house” was replaced with “mobile home” in the 1950’s (Burkhart, 2010; Wilson, 2012). The 1981 HUD code revision included the adoption of “manufactured home” as the prevailing term (Wilson, 2012). Thirty two years later, Wordnet is still referring to the product using terms such as “trailer house” and “mobile home.”

I respectfully request that the definition be updated to reflect the government and industry recognized term that properly represents the product. In the event that you need further proof to justify requested changes, I have provided a reference list of peer reviewed sources used in this letter.

Lisa TylerSincerely,
Lisa Tyler, DBA (ABD), MBA

References

Aman, D., & Yarnal, B. (2010). Home sweet mobile home? Benefits and challenges of mobile home ownership in rural Pennsylvania.Applied Geography30(1), 84–95. doi:10.10.1016/j.apgeog.2009.09.001

Burkhart, A. (2010, February 5). Bringing manufactured housing into the real estate finance system. Pepperdine Law Review, Forthcoming; Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-06. Retrieved from http://ssrn.com/abstract=1548441

Dawkins, C., & Koebel, C. (2010). Overcoming barriers to placing manufactured housing in metropolitan communities. Journal of the American Planning Association76(1), 73–89. doi:10.1080/01944360903401052

Kusenbach, M. (2009). Salvaging decency: Mobile home residents’ strategies of managing the stigma of “trailer” living. Qualitative Sociology32(4), 399–428. doi:10.1007/s11133-009-9139-z

McCarty, W. (2010). Trailers and trouble? An examination of crime in mobile home communities. Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research12(2), 127. Retrieved from https://atoz-ebsco-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/Customization/Tab/12486?tabId=5371

Nahmens, I., & Ikuma, L. (2009). An empirical examination of the relationship between lean construction and safety in the industrialized housing industry. Lean Construction Journal, 1–12. Retrieved from www.leanconstructionjournal.org

Tighe, J. R. (2013). Responding to the foreclosure crisis in Appalachia: A policy review and survey of housing counselors. Housing Policy Debate23(1), 111–143. doi:10.1080/10511482.2012.751931

Wilson, B. (2012). An examination of electricity consumption patterns in manufactured housing units. Housing Policy Debate22(3), 175–199. doi:10.1080/10511482.2011.648204

Zhou, Y. (2009). Two essays on American housing markets: The determinants of housing value volatility and the ownership decision for manufactured housing (Ph.D dissertation). Ohio State University, Ohio, United States. Retrieved from http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Zhou%20Yu.pdf?osu1243886980

Georgia Manufactured Housing Association’s Executive Director Sounds off on Princeton WordNet’s “Definition” of Manufactured Homes

April 12th, 2013 No comments

(Editor's Note: As with the MH Retailer's letteror the MHC Community manager's letters, linked as shown, this letter below was sent to Princeton's WordNet in response to their flawed definition of manufactured homes as found online and reported in this blog post.)

Princeton WordNet

Good Afternoon,
I have always appreciated the consistency and accuracy of www.wordnet.com but recently I read an industry article concerning your definition of Manufactured Housing. A recent industry article informed me that your definition of "Manufactured Home" is as follows:  "Mobile home: a large house trailer that can be connected to utilities and can be parked in one place and used as permanent housing."

I would certainly like to think someone with the IQ, life experiences, and test scores required to be accepted as a student at Princeton or to gain employment on the prestigious Princeton Faculty could certainly come up with a more comprehensive term for Factory Built Housing or Manufactured Housing. As a matter of fact, I am 100% convinced people of your intelligence can certainly challenge themselves to a higher level of vocabulary development than what you have demonstrated thus far. People like me that have committed their entire adult lives to the success of this industry would be so appreciative.

I will leave you with a few facts. In Georgia where I am located 43% of our residents live in Manufactured Housing. All of our homes are built to the Federal HUD Code, the International Building Code (IBC) or the International Residential Code (IRC). The latter two codes are accepted worldwide. Over 70% of our homes are installed on a permanent foundation and never moved again for the life of the homes. The National Home Builders Association recognizes that our housing has recently been rated by an independent engineering and architectural firm as having an average lifespan of 53 years. That we build homes on a daily basis that exceed 2500 square feet.

Thank you for your consideration,

Jay HamiltonC. Jay Hamilton
Executive Director
Georgia Manufactured Housing Association
199 East Main Street
Forsyth, Georgia 31029
Phone 478-994-0006
Cell 478 394 5114

(Editor's Note: The email address for the WordNet team is: wordnet@princeton.edu please take a few moments and email them, asking them to update their definition of manufactured housing. You can use the example above, the one by Retailer Jody Anderson or by Community Manager James Cook, all of which bring a flavor and punch not found in the original sent by Tony Kovach linked here. Whatever you do, email  wordnet@princeton.edu something you like, to encourage they update their outdated and flawed “definition.“