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The Importance for Businesses and Investors in Manufactured Housing for Selecting the Next Supreme Court Justice

June 30th, 2018 No comments

Predictability in law is the key to a prosperous Republic. Laws must be interpreted based on the language in them first and foremost. Only, when the language is unclear, should a judge seek evidence on related legislative discourse and legislative intent at the time the law was passed to help interpret it. Otherwise, law risks becoming whatever a particular Judge or powerful person/group wants it to be.

This was the consistent judicial philosophy of former Justice Antonin Scalia, and often adopted by Justice Kennedy.

Seeking Justices who interpret the laws based on their personal conclusion of what culture wants or what one Legislator said about a law, or what the law means in another country, results in the creation of different law created by the Judicial Branch, the branch of government neither elected by nor accountable to the people.

PredictabilityInLawIstheKeyToAPropserousRepublicKurtKelleyManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

Illustrations like the above and the headline are supplied by the editor of MHProNews, which is customary for a guest column. The text supplied are the unedited, thoughtful words of Kurt Kelley, delivered via email, on the topic of the importance of who will replace Justice Anthony “Tony” Kennedy on the nation’s high court.

Justice Sotomayor’s recent dissent opinion regarding the “President Trump Travel Ban” is an example of the danger of violating Scalia’s decision formula. She based her emotional opinion on what she viewed as President Trump’s intent as evidenced by select things President Trump said while campaigning, versus what the law specifically said in plain English. Justice Sotomayor concluded the law was a ban on all Muslims entering the United States. However, the “Trump Travel Ban” neither states this nor is it applied in such fashion by Border Control. ##

KurtKelleyJDMobileAgencyMHRManufacturedHousingIndustryVoicesMHProNewsKurt Kelley, J.D.
Mobile Agency, MHR
The Woodlands, Texas

 

 

Others are invited to sound off on this, or other industry topics.

Related Report:

“I Hate Politics!” – Bedminster Watch, and Manufactured Housing Shipments

Free Trade or Economic War?

April 6th, 2018 No comments

Anyone going to school in the U.S. after WW II has learned the breakdown in world trade was a primary, though not only, cause of the Great Depression. It is said import tariffs and barriers caused world trade to be constrained. There is little doubt it was a cause.

I grew up believing it and have done so with little retrospective most of my life. As U.S. auto plants closed in the 1980s and forward (I was a GM dealer at the time), I blamed the unions, the workers, and incompetent auto company management. Whole swaths of the country from the Great Lakes to Maine back to the Mason-Dixon Line started to lose industrial plants, in the heartland of America. They became destroyed areas, bereft of jobs and hope. The bombing campaigns of W.W. II Europe couldn’t have caused greater damage.

FreeTradeOrEconomicWarMartyLavin475

Yet with the belief in free trade in the country so ingrained, we blamed the fallen for their fate. I was part of that crowd. It never occurred to me to ask if free trade was so good, why is its impact so disastrous for the U.S.? Not until recently, that is.

And surely our race for government control of every aspect of our economy led to manacled industrial results, especially in heavy industry. But I heard our technology would bail us out. Who needed autos, steel, aluminum and other smoke stack industries, what with their pollution and dirt? Not the U.S. Uhm, we forgot we needed their jobs.

This all played a terrible self-destruction to our heavy industry and their secondary affiliates. The politicians in power either didn’t see the developments, didn’t have answers, or didn’t care. We have seen recently how quickly our economy can respond when unleased. How hard was that?

It’s obvious that the last 30 years, especially our last 8 years prior to 2017, that one of the most important OleMartyBoy Principles was not understood by our heros in government: “You get more of what you encourage and less of what you discourage.” Simple, eh, but entirely overlooked by our government until last year.

YouGetMoreOfWhatYouEncourageLessofWhatYouDiscourageMartyLavin

I understand Free Trade means that each of the parties share similar rules as to access, tariffs, government industrial financial assistance and the like. Each of the parties is to operate in trade under similar rules, with shared understandings.

Still, the economic talking points by the media trumpet Free Trade, when even the dead and buried know there is little of it with many of our trade partners, especially The People’s Republic of China. That is the problem seemingly overlooked when media discussions center on the subject. Often the quoted experts are those who profit from trade, free or not, usually the finance contingent.

When a trading partner has rules heavily skewed in their direction, as in the case of China, it is very difficult to achieve free trade. Does each party have similar access to the other’s markets? Are tariffs similar? Are privately owned companies in the U.S. competing against government backed Chinese companies who can survive long after a privately-owned U.S. company would be long gone, and thus undercutting its pricing? And most importantly, does the other country operate in a relatively free market?

China has over a billion plus person population. It is a giant country that has been backward, isolated and extremely poor. Coming out of W.W. II, it had a puny, agrarian economy. Its communist dictatorship created a command economy. The U.S., as it had done with Germany, Italy, Japan, and non-communist Europe helped re-establish the shattered economies of these countries with trade. China, under the yoke of brutal Chairman Mao, spent much of the post-war period avoiding the U.S. and brutalizing much of its citizenry. Like all old men, The Great Prick, Mao finally died. A special place is reserved for Him in Hell.

The new generation of Chinese leaders decided their best bet to continue to rule the dictatorship was to open their economy to trade so fewer of their citizens starved every year. We now enter in the final phase of that stage in China. It’s emergence as a world power has been achieved by an almost capitalist drive for growth and trade. Now that fewer of its citizens are starving, it has turned its attention to waging an economic war on the rest of the world.

After the war, Germany sprung economically quickly, Japan following behind, then most of non-communist Europe followed suit. Ex-Communist Europe still struggles. China followed very slowly for years. Their agrarian economy, lack of infrastructure, large over-population, and strict communist control hindered easy solutions for China’s emergence.

But once going in the 1980s, to the present, they blew forward. And who became their greatest trading partner and deliverer of free technology they seemed incapable of creating? Why, good old Uncle Sam. Sam made many concessions to the Chinese to help them economically. In fact the emergence was so great, that the New York Times’ ace reporter, Tom Friedman advocated the U.S. should adopt the Chinese model for the economy. We saw how well that direction worked with the economic performance of Tom’s favorite President, Barack Hussein Obama.

I suffered thru much of the 1980’s when Japan, Inc. was running rough shod over our economy and we all believed they would easily control us. They were going to buy everything in America! Lost any sleep on that one recently? We sure did then. They were then the Asian powerhouse, akin to their speed in conquering much of South East Asia during the war, then unable to maintain their advantage against the U.S., just like in the war.

In Japan, the command economy stumbled badly in the 1990s and continues to do so. Picking many winners in the economy early boosted them, but command economies seem incapable of letting the losers die, dragging down all with them, by not cleansing by dying. The losers stayed alive with government help, as many do to this day.

Lying in wait in the Chinese economy lurks the same virus, as it does in all command economies, germinating even as we breathe. The trade deficit in the news is that China is enjoying a $350-$500 Billion-dollar annual trade deficit with the US and a $300 billion-dollar annual technology transfer as a gift, (actually by theft). Quickly, who has the most to lose in this transaction? China or Americans no longer able to go to Walmart to buy more cheap unneeded junk?

The economic talking heads making their living on Wall Street or Washington, D.C. care little about American workers displaced for years. Deplorables! Now the economic bigshots lament the possible trade war with China because it threatens their stew, citing the loss of cheap goods for us to buy. Where were these folks all those years as hard working Americans were thrown from their jobs, in places like Buffalo, Detroit and Youngstown, all dead cities. You know, “free” trade is a must, for the elites.

In this blather over free trade, the one thing I have never heard is that the actions of the Chinese constitute an economic war against the U.S., and has been since Nixon went to China. Dead soldiers, bombed cities, lost industry, and loss of fortune is the result of a shooting war.  They are easy to spot. An economic war is harder to see, but the results are similar; ruined cities, lost industry, citizen agony, broken dreams, destruction of the American economy.  We have been living with that. The results are easily visible. It does seem difficult to see from Wall Street and D.C.

This war is being done on the backs of our workers and industry, and our economy. The trade rules are not similar. Technology is stolen en masse. Their markets are often closed to us. They are very smart people and have been out maneuvering us for 50 years. How dumb can we be?

Even though they now have a first world economy, by choice they have a third world pay scale for their workers. This creates quality goods at a price our companies cannot hope to match. And between their lack of free trade and subsidy of the cost of their goods, how do our companies compete? The answer is obvious, we can’t. Thus this massive transfer of wealth from us to them, allowing them to continue their economic war unabated. This has built their new cities, airports, schools, roads and infrastructure to first world standards.

Their actions in the command economy injures their workers as well, keeping a massive economy acting like they barely succeed with worker earnings. But this action is getting pushback as countries wake up from their slumber.

I am running a contest. Thinking the talking heads will prevail, and we do nothing about the predatory Chinese trade practices, I am looking for a worker’s name. I want to know the name of the last American industrial worker, the one who turns off the lights in the last manufacturing plant in the country, just as it closes. Email me the name and the winner gets $100.00 and a video tour of Detroit. ##

marty-lavin-posted-on-mhpronewsMartin V “Marty” Lavin, J.D.
Burlington, VT
Winter Residence, Miami, FL

Editor’s Notes: Marty is a community, retail, and finance veteran who is an MHI award winner.

Note 2: The content is penned by Marty, but the illustrations are provided by the editor. 

The Long, Long Trailer, Keith Olbermann’s ‘Trailer Park Trash’ – Frank Rolfe, Mobile Home University, Response

April 24th, 2017 No comments

It is amazing to me that any media person can stereotype millions of Americans without being worried about their career being at stake.

In today’s politically correct world, why is it acceptable to use such a derogatory term as trailer park trash?

Newscasters and journalists are losing their careers over the use of every other insulting slang term  — however minor — simply from special interest groups threatening to boycott the advertisers. So why is “trailer trash” the one insulting term in the U.S. that you can use without any fear of reprisal? Is it because the average American feels it’s true, thanks to the consistent negative portrayal of the industry in the media?

Not too long ago, the reverse was true. “The Long, Long Trailer” starring Lucille Ball was a big film in 1953. Elvis lived in a “trailer park” in the films “It Happened at the World’s Fair” in 1963 and “Speedway” in 1968. Back then, the media portrayed “trailer park trash” as wearing tuxedos and driving sports cars — a 180 degree difference.

So why did they change their tune?

I think that education is the solution. Those in the industry know that there are some terrible properties out there, but they are a tiny fringe group of the 44,000 communities in the U.S. The average manufactured home community resembles a traditional subdivision — sometimes nicer than the surrounding subdivisions. We can only change the “trailer park trash” stereotype by convincing the general public that the term is unfair and offensive and not a statement of fact. That would generate a grassroots movement to protest the term aggressively and that, in turn, would scare the media away from ever using it again. If any journalist who uttered the phrase “trailer park trash” immediately lost their job, then it would disappear overnight.

So how do you educate the public about what our residents are really like? One method would be to fire off a barrage of articles — backed up by facts — on why the term has no place in a modern America; tied, via Google, to every article in which the negative terms are used.

Another would be to talk openly and honestly to the media and let them walk properties and talk to residents and break down their perceptions.

Finally — and this would be very expensive — to do a proactive public relations campaign that is clever and effective.

Am I offended by the term “trailer park trash” in the media recently? Certainly. I’m also disappointed and amazed. But I think it also serves as a wake-up call that our industry has a huge amount of work to do. When these negative terms disappear forever, then we will have done our job and elevated the industry to the next level.  ##

FrankRolfeRVHorizonsMobileHomeUnivtKeithOlbermannTrailerParkTrashRemarkIndustryVoicesManufacturedHousingIndustryMHProNews

The headline and this graphic are produced and provided by MHProNews, a common practice among many in media to illustrate opinion or letters to the editor columns.

FrankRolfeRVHorizonsMHUnivPostedINdustryVoicesManufacturedHomeIndustryCommentaryMHProNewsFrank Rolfe
RV Horizons and Mobile Home University

(Editor’s Note 1: Rolfe’s comments are made with respect to a tweet by Keith Olbermann, published in an article on Washington, D.C.’s ‘The Hill,” see link here, or at the top, above.

Note 2: MHProNews contacted several top people at the Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI), as well as their media contact, to give them an opportunity to share a comment or respond. As of this time, more than 48 hours later, they have not done so.)

“Absolute Disgrace!” MH Industry Association Leader Reacts to Keith Olbermann’s “Trailer Park Trash” Tweet, Reported on The Hill

April 24th, 2017 No comments

It’s an absolute disgrace that this pejorative somehow remains ‘socially acceptable’ among the politically correct elite and their mouthpieces.

People like Olbermann, who routinely slam others over alleged “micro-aggressions” and other fabricated nonsense, would do well to show proper and decent respect for the millions of hard-working Americans who are able to own a home of their own because of the unequalled affordability of manufactured homes located either in — or outside of — manufactured home communities.

MMarkWeissManufacturedHousingAssociationForRegulatoryReformMHARRPostedIndustryVoicesMHProNews

The headline and this graphic are produced and provided by MHProNews, a common practice among some in media to illustrate opinion or ‘letters to the editor’ columns.

They, and a lot of other Americans living in the heartland of the country, deserve better than this type of arrogant slander. ##

MMarkWeissCEO-MHARR-ManufacturedHousingAssociationforRegulatoryReform-posted-IndustryVoices-MHProNewsMark Weiss
President & CEO
Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR)
1331 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Suite 512
Washington, D.C. 20004
Phone: 202/783-4087
Fax: 202/783-4075
Email: MHARRDG@AOL.COM

(Editor’s Note 1: Weiss’ comments are made with respect to a tweet by Keith Olbermann, published in an article on Washington, D.C.’s ‘The Hill,” see link here, or at the top, above.

Note 2: MHProNews contacted several top people at the Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI), as well as their media contact, to give them an opportunity to share a comment or respond. As of this time, As of this time, more than 48 hours later, they have not done so.)

“Intolerant!” – Community Owner Reacts to Keith Olbermann’s “Trailer Park Trash” tweet, reported on The Hill

April 24th, 2017 No comments

It was an intolerant remark in so many ways.

There are millions of good, honorable, hard-working folks who choose the affordable option of living in a mobile home.

MariBlaquiereHighlandMobileParkStPetersburgFLAboutKeithOlbermannTrailerParkTrashRemark

The headline and this graphic are produced and provided by MHProNews, a common practice among many in media to illustrate opinion or letters to the editor columns.

I don’t know why the Leftist media, and the Left in general, have no obligation to be inclusive or tolerant or accurate. Their driveling commentary just makes me tired.

MariBlaquiereHighlandMobileParkStPetersburgFLMari Blaquiere
Co-Owner Highland Mobile Park
St Petersburg, FL

(Editor’s Note: Blaquiere’s comments are made with respect to a tweet by Keith Olbermann, published in an article on Washington, D.C.’s ‘The Hill,” see link here, or at the top, above.)

Call to Defund NPR draws Manufactured Home Community Owner Richard Nodel, Nodel Parks, Reaction

February 18th, 2017 No comments

Negative coverage of our industry is something many media outlets are guilty of, but I am a patriot first.

Anything that is an abridgment of our constitutional rights is a greater threat to all of us than just a negative news article.

Let’s fight bad information with good information, and not have to resort to unAmerican activities like censorship of the media.

Just because we don’t like the report, do we try and shutter the source? ##

RichardNodel-owner-NodelParks-manufacturedhomecommunities-posted-IndustryVoices-manufacturedhousingindustrynewsMHProNews-com-150x218Richard Nodel
Nodel Parks

(Editor’s note: Richard Nodel’s Industry Voices guest comment came in response to the commentary on the Daily Signal, linked here, calling for NPR to be defunded.  Landy was cited in the article, linked below.

NPR and Fair Housing: Is “Liberal Bias” Creating Fake News?)

AnythingAbridgementConstitutionalRightsGreaterThreatThanNegativeNewsArticleFightBadInfowithGoodInformationRichardNodelIndustryVoicesNodelParksMHProNews

The headline and this text graphic are provided by the editor, as is common with most publications. The comments are those of the writer, Richard Nodel.  Other thoughtful comments by Industry Voices on this or other topics of professional interest are encouraged.

Manufactured Housing Millennial Sounds off on Industry Opportunity

February 18th, 2017 No comments

As conventional housing prices and mortgage rates continue to rise, the Millennial generation and others are looking for smart options. Many desire to move from renting to owning, but often struggle to find that a real possibility in the current site built market. The manufactured housing industry can offer a solution to that problem.

Today’s manufactured homes can look and live like a conventional, site built house, and can be half the price of new construction. Additionally, many manufactured homes are Energy Star rated, so they are more efficient than older existing homes.

BenefitsManufacturedHomeMillennialLindseyBostickSunshineHomesRedBayALPostedManufacturedHomeIndustryVoicesMHProNews

Headline and this text graphic are provided by the editor, as is common with most publications. The comments are those of the writer, Lindsey Bostick.

Energy consumption is an important factor to many people today, especially the Millennial generation. I know the benefits of purchasing a manufactured home because, as a millennial myself, I live in a residential style manufactured home that I purchased last year.  ##

LindseyBostick-SunshineHomesManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

Lindsey Bostick
Sunshine Homes
(Editor’s Notes: Lindsey Bostick’s comments are in relation to reports, such as the ones linked here and here.

For the interview, A Cup of Coffee with…Lindsey Bostick, Sunshine Homes, click here.)

NPR’s Syringa Mobile Home Park Story, Revisited by Community Owner

January 23rd, 2017 No comments

In the NPR story, the blame is on the community owner, tenants, county, and state.  This failure is across-the-board and does not represent the industry as whole, but is a growing problem that needs to be addressed when communities are used for investment purposes by those who don’t know what they are doing.

  • There is no excuse for the manufactured home community owners’ absence in managing his property.
    • Public utilities and infrastructure needs to be addressed.
    • It should be noted that with old infrastructure, you are going to have water line breaks and rare system failures. Many can be avoided, but some can be unknowable in advance.  Redundancy and daily inspections help prevent system failures.
    • The owner may not have the revenue to repair systems, and may need to tap utilities into local public water and wastewater systems.
  • Where is the tenant accountability?  Homes are personal property (unless units are rentals), and there is trash and debris everywhere in the photos from Syringa Mobile Home Park, in Moscow, ID.
  • Judging by the state of a many of the homes in the photos; they should be repaired, demoed, and/or replaced.  By allowing the living conditions to exist, the owner becomes part of the problem.
TomFathNewDurhamEstatesonCommentsOnNPRMobileHomeParkStory-postedIndustryVoicesMHProNews

Image credit, MHProNews. The headline and image are provided by the editor.

  • If homes are being left and are personal property, the county should be responsible with the community owner/tenant to remove homes. ##
tomfathnewdurhamestates-manufacturedhousingindustrymanufacturedhomecommunity-industryvoices-mhpronews

Tom Fath, co-owner, New Durham Estates.

Tom Fath | Operations Manager
New Durham Estates and Home Sales

Todd Lamb on NPR’s ‘Mobile Home Park Owners Can Spoil An Affordable American Dream’

January 4th, 2017 No comments

Tony, you are the third person sending me this NPR article. I read it and have BIG problems with the way the article was written.

The biggest problem is that it makes the City [of Moscow, ID] look powerless. In my experience, for far less, I’ve seen fines issued and many other tactics delivered to owners to force their way. Also, the city should have delivered the solution and fined the owner.

Where is the City or County responsibility in this issue? Really 90 days without water – I doubt that. If that is true (which I have no idea how those people lived without water for 90 days), the City should have been involved.

While it is true that community owners can direct the look and feel of a community, the safety of water and supply of water comes from the City or County.

SyringaMobileHomeParkMagarEMagarNPRDaniel ZwerdlingMobile HomeParkOwnersCanSpoilAffordableAmericanDreamManufacturedHousingIndustryVoicesMHProNews

While the letter is that of the author, Todd Lamb, the headline, and images were supplied by MHProNews – the publisher, as illustrations – common with letters-to-the-editor or an op-ed.

In Texas, there are plenty of Government agencies to make sure manufactured home community residents are safely delivered gas, water, and sewer at the Community owner’s expense.

Anyway, this owner is horrible, but the reason there are not many, if any other owners like him, is because it is stupid and bad business.

Who spends their life savings trying to buy an asset to let it go – to become run down and worthless?

It’s more likely that someone ends up in this situation by going into the project undercapitalized and inexperienced. However, that did not sound like the case with this jerk.

This NPR article was written with a consumer advocacy purpose in mind.  A very slanted view of the reality of the actual power and responsibility of a Community owner. ##

ToddGLambLambInvestments1postedIndustryVoices_ManufacturedHomeCommunities-MHIndustry-MHProNews200x200Todd Lamb
Lamb Investments

Paul Bradley ROCUSA Reacts, NPR’s “Mobile Home Park Owners Can Spoil An Affordable American Dream”

January 2nd, 2017 No comments

Part I of the NPR story needed a balanced industry response that came clean first and then provided many real examples how “the charges” are not typical.  I personally know a lot of very good operators and I always offer them as examples when I’m called.

PaulBradleyROCUSAReactstoNPR-MobileHomeParkOwnersCanSpoilAffordableAmericanDream-IndustryVoicesMHProNews-

Part II of the NPR story delved into resident ownership and I expect more coverage as reporters look to bring voice to President-elect Trump’s voters.  Couple that with the entrepreneurial spirit and return to local ownership that is resident ownership through and through and you can see why I expect great opportunities under President Trump and his focus on America first.

Paul Bradley
President
ROC USA

(Editor’s Note: Bradley is reacting to the NPR story, see our initial report, linked here. Bradley recently purchased a manufactured home for his mother, see that story linked here.)