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“Trailer Park Boys” Al Kemp, Canadian Manufactured Home Community Association, Reacts to Netflix Series

December 20th, 2018 No comments

Hi Tony, 

The short answer is that – at least in Canada – “trailer park” connotes exactly the type of persons portrayed in Trailer Park Boys.  This is a long-standing stereotype that was perhaps somewhat relevant 25 or more years ago.   

Today, manufactured home communities – our preferred term, and one more common in the USA than in Canada – are the antithesis of what “TPBoys” represents.  Are there still a few that fit the stereotype?  Yes, just as there a few run-down apartment buildings whose owners only care about receiving rent.

In Canada, manufactured homes must be built to a federal building code standard – Z240.  They are 2 x 4 or 2 x 6 construction, fully insulated with strong frames and roofs and sheetrock walls – the same as a fixed building.  A new home can sell for $150,000 to $300,000 CAD.  Compare this with the price of a similar sized fixed building: in the million-dollar range in Toronto and Vancouver; half a million plus almost anywhere else.

TrailerParkBoysCommentaryAlKempExecutiveDirectorManufacturedHomeParkOwnersAllianceBritishColumbiaDailyBusienssNewsMHProNews

The headline and this illustration are by MHProNews, which are customarily provided by the editor. The commentary is by Al Kemp, of the Canadian trade association as shown. Words in brackets are to clarify the meaning, and were supplied by MHProNews.  Editor’s note – Al’s “TPBoys” is a clever turn of a phrase! 

 

More important are the residents.  Typically, manufactured home community residents in Canada own their homes and have lived in the community for 10 to 30 years.  They aren’t drug dealers or [drug] producers; they aren’t partyers or uncontrolled alcoholics; they don’t get into fist fights, or do anything else that would make for an “interesting??” TV show.  Also, more and more young couples and families are moving in to manufactured home communities. recognizing them as an affordable housing alternative to renting an apartment, and because home ownership is otherwise out of their reach.

We say “communities” intentionally.  An apartment dweller, whether in an owned condo or a rental unit, might know one or two others, often just to say hello in the elevator. Because of the structure of manufactured home communities, and the tenure of residents, everyone not only knows most everyone else, they look out for each other, take care of a neighbour’s home while they go to Arizona for the winter.  The community has barbeques and pot luck dinners, bingo nights and garage sales. 

Pretty well everything I’ve described above wouldn’t play well on TPBoys!

The harmful aspect of the show was that it reinforced the negative stereotype that most politicians hold of our industry.  I once spoke to the Mayor of a small town in northern BC [British Columbia] and asked him how many communities there were in the area.  He replied, “Three, and I’d like to get rid of all four of them!”  Two of the three were members of our association, and I know they abided by our code of ethics, provided much needed housing (and property taxes) in the area, etc.

Our industry in Canada faces the ongoing challenge of a demand for more communities against a political resistance to their development.  We did a survey of our members earlier this year; the average vacancy rate was one site for every two communities.

What we need – and it would never attract sponsors – is a show called, “Manufactured Home Communities – the Ignored Affordable Housing Alternative.”

We will be launching a separate web site shortly, the content of which will be targeted at the 25 – 45 generation; ready to buy a home, but needing thousands more to do so.  It will contain stories from community residents, descriptions of homes, manufacturing processes, etc.  I’d be happy to send you the link once it is up and running early next year. ##

 

AlKempManufacturedHomeParkOwnersAllianceBritishColumbiaIndustryVoicesMHProNewsAl Kemp

Executive Director

Manufactured Home Park Owners Alliance of British Columbia (BC)

250-213-2627

Social Media, Mass Emails vs. the Personal Touch? Field Testing Business Development Methodologies

November 29th, 2018 No comments

As someone who has been selling my services globally for over forty years, I recently decided to dramatically reduce using technology, social media and mass email marketing as my primary approach to achieving increased sales and acquiring new clients.

Now before you start shaking your head and laughing until you can’t breathe – hear me out.

Everything keeps changing – from direct mail, fax machines and snail mail to texts, websites, YouTube, and email blasts to who knows what it will be tomorrow.

We all have a choice – evolve, adjust, improvise and adapt or stay stuck and comfortable.

Well, as an author I have been sending out my Weekly Email Booster articles around the world every Monday for over 15 years to over 100,000 subscribers.  I have six websites and I have over 4500 Facebook friends and 2500 Linkedin connections – so before you start pointing fingers about where you think this article is going – you might want to just chill before judging me.

I am not against change, progress or new stuff.  I am also not against fundamentals, the basics, and what works.  I am an advocate for what I refer to in many of my seminars and keynotes as a belief in The Blending Process.

Let me explain.

Years ago, I spent hours on the phone every week telemarketing.  I sent out direct mail on average of once a month to over a thousand potential prospects and I also gave away over 500 copies of one of my books every year to potential customers and clients.

Well, something changed – Now I had to have a website, a blog, send emails, follow up with texts etc. etc. etc.  So, I adapted.

I let go of what worked for twenty-five plus years and started over with the new wave of marketing, sales, and promotion. That included all the jazz of SEO for search engines, measuring and counting clicks, and well I could go on, but the odds are good that you know all that stuff.

And you know what happened? Business over the years gradually got slower and slower, and why?

Perhaps I lost via electronics the personalized uniqueness of my telephone contacts.  My creativity, my cleverness, and was now just a part of a bigger (and much bigger than I could ever compete with) competitive world. Now, you could say, “Well Tim, maybe you just weren’t in touch enough to hold your own.”  NO, I finally figured it out.  Yes, millions of people want to become famous on Facebook.  Millions of people want to be known by their Twitter handle and millions of people get hundreds of emails every week that the vast majority just don’t read.  Those are facts.

A friend of mine provided the following data from MailChimp, similar to what Constant Contact or others use.

Per Mail Chimp, in Media and Publishing, the average open rate is 17.3%. For many kinds of emails, that number is high.  Also in Media and Publishing, the average click through rate is a mere 3.6%. Imagine, for people who sign up for reading someone’s email news, less than 4% will actually click through?  By the way, my friend does much, much better than those totals, but it still reflects how low those opens and clicks actually are.

 

Back to the Future?

Try it, just go to any social media site for an hour and do nothing but stroll.  And you know what you will find?  Thousands of people trying to create a niche, fame, new friends (and I use that term very lightly) in some market or with some group or to just feel important or not alone in some way.

Social media, websites, emails etc. are not the end of the story.  Nothing in the past 2000 years has ever been the end of the story and this law or rule has not changed.  Someday in the future – something new or different will replace what is common and comfortable today.

So – lessons learned, I decided for the end of 2018 and all of 2019 I would try an experiment – I would go back to the way I did things twenty and thirty years ago – telephone calls, follow-up notes, thank you cards and no online submissions for new business but conversations with the hiring influence.

“So, Tim, how is going back to the past working for you?”

 

TimConnorCSPManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

 

Well, I’m not going to brag or act like I’ve got everything in life and business figured out better than others, but what I will say is; I’m having more fun, I’m enjoying my client relationships better, I’m getting more referrals like I used to, I’m back to separating myself from the crowd NOT THE CLOUD, my cost of doing business is less than it has been in years, I’m creating more valuable relationships and it feels good to know that I don’t have to follow the masses to be successful and enjoy life and the time I have.

The short term results are the same going lower tech, my time invested in marketing is about the same, my costs are lower, and long term, there are indicators that this will be more successful than all of those electronic contacts were.

Let me repeat – I’m not telling anyone what they should or shouldn’t do when it comes to business development, sales, marketing, promotion etc.

All I’m saying is that there are things in the past – called fundamentals and basics – that when blended with both the now and what can or will be in the future are the best combination of tactics, strategies and/or techniques to use if you want contentment, peace and personal value and not just success.

What will you try new in 2019? ##  (See bonus video, below.)

By Tim Connor, CSP

 

 

Law Allows Real Estate Personnel to Sell Homes in Your Manufactured Home Community

March 7th, 2018 No comments

Real estate personnel are now allowed to sell homes in manufactured and mobile home parks without first having to be licensed as a broker under the Arizona Division of Manufactured Housing, Department of Housing.

The new law [in AZ] allows:

1) Licensed real estate brokers and salespeople to sell new or used manufactured homes and mobile homes located in mobile home parks if the licensed broker or salesperson is acting as an agent for a licensed Manufactured Housing Dealer and the Dealer is responsible for filing all of the required paperwork and submitting the required fees on the sale of the home

2) Licensed real estate brokers and salespeople to sell used manufactured homes and mobile homes located in mobile home parks if they are acting on behalf of a private party and the broker or salesperson then remains subject to the real estate licensure requirements

MHCA’s task force on this topic, consisting of Greg Johnloz, Keith Vanderhout and Mel Comstock, are done with all of the forms real estate personnel will need to sell the homes. MHCA hired a law firm which works with the Arizona Association of Realtors (AAR) to prepare the forms, and then sent them to MHCA’s attorneys for review. AAR has shared the contracts and information on this law with their members and we should find some realtors interested in selling our homes.

RealEstatePersonnelCanSellMHCASusanBrentonManufacturedHousingIndustryVoicesDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

In addition, MHCA is preparing a three-hour class on selling homes in our communities and hopefully it will be approved as a class eligible for the continuing education required of real estate personnel. We will also be working with the 12 different Multiple-Listing Services in Arizona on this topic.

MHCA believes this is an important new law which will bring more prospective buyers into our communities. ##

Susan_BrentonManufacturedHousingCommunitiesAZ-DailyBusinessNewsMHProNews202Susan Brenton
MANUFACTURED HOUSING COMMUNITIES OF ARIZONA

2158 North Gilbert Road
Suite #116
Mesa, AZ 85203

Editor’s Note: the headline and the graphic/quote are provided by the publisher, as is customary.

State Association Quits Membership in Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI), Explains in Writing, Why?

February 9th, 2018 No comments

The manufactured housing industry has long been a mainstay of affordable housing in the United States.  For decades the industry has provided an unmatched quality of life with an affordability not seen in any other sector of the housing market.  The homes and the land lease communities in which they are situated have become fixtures across the country providing an affordable, quality lifestyle to all segments of our population.  Over the years it has seen its ups and downs, but has been able to survive and even thrive through the difficult times.  The greatest hindrance and the greatest threat to the industry is not the economy, the homes or the communities, it is governmental interference and over regulation. 

The Manufactured Housing Communities of Arizona (MHCA) is a statewide association representing community owners in Arizona.  As state associations do, the MHCA has been very active and productive at the state level in combatting governmental interference with its burdensome regulations and obstacles.  At the state level most community owner associations have been able to not only monitor proposed local and statewide legislation, but interact with legislators to prevent onerous regulations that are detrimental to our industry.

The MHCA had joined a national association in hopes that we would get the same representation and effectiveness at a national level.  The national legislation and rule making over the last ten years has proven that we do not have that representation.  One only has to look at the passage of the Safe Act and the Dodd-Frank Act to see how devastating and onerous national legislation can be.  Other similar chattel groups (the RV industry) saw the proposals and their representation managed to have them exempted.  The national organization to which we belonged was apparently unaware of the legislation and its ramifications until after passage and it was already being implemented.  The rule making in the aftermath has been horrendous and little if anything has been done to stop the bleeding.  Recently, HUD has issued rules concerning the screening of prospective tenants for our communities.  Again, we find no one aware of what is happening, much less advocating on our behalf.  Installation requirements are being implemented that have no basis in common sense and the result will be additional burdens on community owners and added costs for homeowners.

Due to the lack of effective representation at a national level, the MHCA withdrew its membership from the national association to pursue other avenues of representation. We are not the only state association to do so.  The MHCA has been exploring other options; including hiring a lobbying firm that is prominent in Washington, D.C. 

MHCommunitiesOfAZNealTHaneyPresidentWhyTheyQuitManufacturedHousingInstituteMHIDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews737x214

In some cases, the state associations represent community owners only and in others there is a single association representing all aspects of the industry.  We need a national association to advocate on behalf of community owners.  It does not need to be an association with conferences to attend or one that requires numerous meetings and publications.  Such an association needs to be very narrowly focused on monitoring proposed legislation and rule making.  We need someone to advocate on behalf of the community owners.  This singular task needs to be done at the congressional level and in the departments that make policy affecting our industry.  Every community owner, and every association that is accepting membership dues from community owners, should be concerned with the lack of representation at the national level and should be involved in finding adequate representation.  If you are willing to be a part of the solution, please contact our association office.

Manufactured Housing Communities of Arizona
2158 N Gilbert Road, Ste. 116
Mesa AZ 85203
Phone: 480.345.4202, Toll free 800.351.3350

You may also email our Executive Director Susan Brenton at: sbrenton@azmhca.com.

Thank you for your consideration on how you can help shape the future of our industry.

Sincerely, 

Neal T Haney,
President


##

ManufacturedHousingCommunitiesofAZLogoIndustryVoicesDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

McCrory Lawsuit – “Significant Victory Against Zoning Discrimination” – Manufactured Homes

November 30th, 2017 No comments

The McCrory lawsuit is a significant victory against zoning discrimination that many working families in Arkansas face from cities and towns when they attempt to place a factory-built dwelling unit in a territorial jurisdiction governed by municipal ordinances and regulations.

Although federal regulation preempts cities from out-and-out discrimination against units built in compliance with the Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards – the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has been hesitant to enforce the ‘enhanced preemption’ granted in the MHIA of 2000 – –  or even the Department’s own ‘preemption policy’ or statement of ‘internal guidance’ on local zoning matters.

And, even though state law in Arkansas prohibits cities from totally banning manufactured/modular home placements; restricting them only to rented lots in ‘parks’; or setting conditions/restrictions that are dissimilar to those for ‘site-built units’ – a number of cities still attempt to unduly restrict MH placements due to unsubstantiated fears of plummeting property values and ‘undesirables’ that their decisions-makers fear will inhabit such domiciles.

ZoningDiscriminationAgainstManufaturedHomeJDHarperExecuitveDirectorArkansasManufacturedHousingAssociationAMHAlogoIndustryVoicesDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

We hope this decision will cause city leaders to consider other, non-arbitrary factors when making decisions about home placement within their towns.

When our organization is allowed to provide advice to cities on how to address the placement of factory-built units within their boundaries – we always caution against arbitrary restrictions (i.e. home value, age, etc.) that would determine if a home would be allowed.

Several tiny cities around McCrory had enacted similar restrictions, and have made changes to their ordinances in response to this lawsuit.

HUD-CodeEnhancedPreemptionManufacturedHousingImprovementAct2000IndustryVoicesJDHarperAMAADailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

The McCrory settlement was obtained by  Equal Justice Under Law,  a civil rights organization. The case will be the subject of a Daily Business News report. The headline and these graphics were provided by MHProNews, as is customary in trade media and other forms of journalism. The text comments were sent by JD Harper to MHProNews for publication. Other perspectives, comments, and news tips are welcomed. Send to iReportMHNewsTips@mhmsm.com with a bold subject line that says NEWS TIP or LETTER TO EDITOR, thank you.

If decision-makers in cities [particularly smaller towns] would take a look at today’s manufactured housing – instead of relying on outdated images, preconceived notions, and the myths, misconceptions and stereotypes that seem to be inextricably linked to this product – I believe they would find it relatively simple to develop ordinances and regulations that would allow the regulated placement of factory-built structures on individual lots and in multi-site developments in a manner that would encourage affordable housing growth.

The McCrory settlement is just another arrow in the quiver to use when city leaders attempt to discriminate against people who might not make as much money as the members of the planning commission or city council – or at least don’t want to spend more for a site-built home. ##

JDHarperExecutiveDirectorArkansasManufacturedHousingAssocPostedMHProNews

By JD Harper
AMHA

A Tale of Broken Hitches

November 29th, 2017 No comments

If you have been in the industry for anytime at all, especially in the area transportation, you have had a hitch failure. It always comes as an inconvenience, but can cause major damage, and injury to other motorists.

Unfortunately, that isn’t where this story starts.

This one starts on a somber November morning when 26 families are told they would be forced to leave a park many had lived in for years.

Some cried, some were mad, some just stood in shock!

The main question, of course, was why?

The owner was a nice compassionate man who had owned the park for years. The park was over 95 percent occupied. I went to see him and investigate what was happening.

Could this all just be a misunderstanding?

The meeting between the owner and I was a solemn one. He stated that it was true.  He was closing the park, and making everyone move.

Normally this isn’t that major of a concern, but this is the third park in my area to close or be re-purposed in less than one year.

Many of their residents live below the poverty line, and are struggling to make ends meet.

Where are they to move to?

Their homes will not pass many park requirements, due to age, and they cannot trade up to a new home that would pass due to their financial position.

This leaves many home owners to simply throw up their hands and walk away.

I asked the park owner to sell. I didn’t want it, nor is it in my long-term plans, but it made better sense then closing.

He declined my offer. He stated that the major driving force in the closing was state and city regulators. The city had recently annexed the area, and TECQ also played their part.

When it was all said and done, the owner couldn’t complete with such force. 

So, I set out with the team to help as many as we could.

We are working with 6 families and have moved 2.

This is where we come to our broken hitch. Due to the age and condition of the homes, we require a hold harmless be signed by all parties.

ShawnFullerIntegrityHomesManufacturedHomeProfessionalDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

We know that these homes can be moved, but must be moved cautiously.

Sure enough, I pulled the most difficult one, and less the 3 miles from its new home, the hitch and header plate failed.

That’s the bad. It gets worse. It happened in front of an affluent high school right after lunch. And within minutes, we had over 15 police officers from 4 different agencies on the scene.

A not so simple repair became almost impossible with the red tape created in a matter of minutes. Some may be asking, why go that way?

It was our only permitted route.

Needless to say, we were able to make the repairs, and get the home safely transported.

The damage? None. I never went over 35 mph the entire time I was moving the home. And due to the fact I was in a school zone I was traveling between 10-15 mph.

ConfidentialNewsTipsOKTipsIreportMHNews@MHMSM-comGraphic-294x430

To report a news tip, click the image above or send an email to iReportMHNewsTips@mhmsm.com – To help us spot your message in our volume of email, please put the words NEWS TIP in the subject line.

We were on site with the home before dark, and with a happy customer. She even argued with the officers that we had done nothing wrong. 

So here is my question to the industry.

What if? What if we get to a place where we don’t have a place to put our products because of overzealous regulators who run good small-and-large parks out of business?

We sit back, and say this can’t happen but it does everyday.

Also what happens when we take “affordable housing” out of our vocabulary, what are we? Just housing…like everybody else.

We need to be collectively active in protecting our industry. 

The two families that we were able to help had their homes installed before Thanksgiving, and I am wishing them a Merry Christmas. ##

ShawnRosaFullerIntegrityHomesTexasManufacturedHousingIndsutryVoicesManufacturedHomeProfessionalsMHProNewsBy Shawn Fuller,


MH Industry Professional, Texas

 

(Editor’s Note: Shawn’s story reminds me of Marty Lavin’s Back to the Cornfields, linked below, and stories too numerous to link. Comments or news tips on this or other industry relevant topics are invited at the link at the right.)

 

“Make MH Great Again” – Marty Lavin Exclusive

Harper – Thank You Rev Donald Tye, Fighting for Enhanced Preemption of Manufactured Homes

July 28th, 2017 No comments

Tony,
I’ve been meaning to take a moment for a couple of weeks now, to send you this message. I apologize for mixing subjects, but – in the end – I believe you’ll find that all these topics relate to one another.

1)    Thank you for your direct question to HUD’s Pam Danner about the City of Kilgore’s plans to further limit the placement of manufactured homes in that city.  I’ve repeatedly questioned why HUD and the administrator’s Office of Manufactured Housing Programs hasn’t acknowledged that preemption was significantly enhanced by the Manufactured Housing Improvement Act of 2000 (MHIA of 2000).

2)   Several of Rev. Donald Tye, Jr.’s comments which you published brought back memories of an MHI Land Use Conference held in Chicago in the late 90’s.  I remember a speaker at that event – a middle-aged black gentleman, who was (I believe) a member of the Illinois General Assembly.  He coined a term for the discrimination by local governments against many forms of affordable housing, particularly manufactured home placements.

That speaker called it “economic racism.”

EconomicRacismIlGenAssemblyRevDonTyeJr-JDHarperArkManufacturedHousingAssoc-IndustryVoicesMHProNews

Collage credit, MHProNews.com – this and the headline are provided by the publisher, as is customary with Op-Eds. The statements are those of the writer.

I’ve thought about the power in that statement many times since that meeting, knowing that he had lived-through the Civil Rights movement.

I’ve spent countless evenings in municipal buildings made of cinder-blocks with bad fluorescent lighting. I’d attend meetings, ‘waging a seemingly-endless war on ignorance’ about our affordable homes (and the people who live in our product) with local decision-makers over the past quarter-century.

So, I appreciate and agree with Rev. Tye’s powerful comments.

3)    In conclusion, I believe many in our society view manufactured housing as some sort of ‘housing of last resort’ for:

  • poor people,
  • illegal immigrants,
  • rednecks,
  • divorcees on public assistance and
  • other undesirable elements of the population.

It’s a stereotype/stigma perpetuated by the media which creates and/or re-enforces barriers to the acceptance, and highest use, of manufactured homes as an affordable housing resource.

I remember a small-town mayor telling me – ‘off the record’ of course – his perspective on inclusionary zoning in his city: “It ain’t the houses, son… It’s the people that live in them.” ##  (Publisher’s note: see the graphic, and link below on Rev. Donald Tye Jr.)

JDHarperExecutiveDirectorArkansasManufacturedHousingAssocPostedMHProNews

 

J.D. Harper
Executive Director
Arkansas Manufactured Housing Association (AMHA)
1123 South University – Suite #720
Little Rock, AR 72204

 

 

 

RevDonaldTyeJrQuotesManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

Click the image above to see one of the articles and topics that these quotes from Tye come from.

 

 

A New Manufactured Home Community Brings Excitement

July 12th, 2017 No comments

How exciting it is that we are having a new community being built in Oklahoma!   We have existing communities that have expanded their communities, but it’s been over 30 years since a community of this scale has broken ground for a MHC in the state, let alone Oklahoma County.

CrystalPriceKOCOTV5NewsOKC-OK-manufacturedhousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews-575x315

Deanna Fields is Op-Ed is reacting in part to local news story, which has been covered by MHProNews at the linked here

Per the Oklahoma County Planning department, their permit will not be revoked. They have done everything the county has/is asking for.  The development will be built.

Even though a special use permit was granted in 1980’s, they have to comply with “today’s” requirements with setbacks & paved streets.  They will be hooked up to a Water District for their water/sewer. and they will be using a aerobic system for their greenbelt.

Plans for a community center, community shelter(s), fencing the perimeter are also projected.  This is going to be a fabulous community bringing forth an affordable lifestyle for hundreds of families!

Currently they are working on erosion control.

DeannaFieldsMHAOLinkedInIndustryVoicesMHProNews.

Deanna Fields, MHAO, credit, LinkedIn.

This development does come close to estate homes in the Edinborough Point Addition (west side) which is in the Edmond city limits.  This MH community is not in the Edmond city limits, which is considered a “bedroom community” a bedroom community suggests that residents sleep in these neighborhoods, but normally work elsewhere; also that there is little commercial or industrial activity beyond a small amount of retail, oriented toward serving the residents.   Edmond residents traditionally protest any large development that infringe on their “bedroom community” lifestyle.  Edmond residences recently protested having a huge upper end apartment complex with a green-belt, Wal-Mart Supercenter and a Warren Theater, all would of put forth “curb appeal”….but the residents said no and won.

There will be a barrier between the MHC development and the Addition.  On MHC east side boundary it is unincorporated land zoned  industrial…so I’m sure a strip mall of some type will probably go in there….or a huge gas station.    Yes, those that live in those estate homes are upset but there is NOTHING they can do about it….unless they want to buy out the developer…..which I doubt will happen….since approved MHC zoning is liquid gold and once they see this community being developed by local developers who care about their neighbors they should be good neighbors.   If not MHAO does have studies available showing existing homes next to a community does not depreciate their homes.  Our industry has studied ourselves extensively over the past several decades.   Plus, comps are already established  in the subdivision.

The only unpleasant problem the industry will see is the County staff are now currently going through their files finding unexpired permits…they have found several for parks.  MHAO will continue our working relations with the Oklahoma County Planner and monitor any proposed changes in their zoning.

MHAO-manufacturedHousingAssociationOfOklahomaDeanna Fields
MHAO Executive Director
6400 S. Shields Blvd., OKC, OK  73149
Email:  mhao@mhao.org
Website: www.mhao.org

 

“Absolute Disgrace!” MH Industry Association Leader Reacts to Keith Olbermann’s “Trailer Park Trash” Tweet, Reported on The Hill

April 24th, 2017 No comments

It’s an absolute disgrace that this pejorative somehow remains ‘socially acceptable’ among the politically correct elite and their mouthpieces.

People like Olbermann, who routinely slam others over alleged “micro-aggressions” and other fabricated nonsense, would do well to show proper and decent respect for the millions of hard-working Americans who are able to own a home of their own because of the unequalled affordability of manufactured homes located either in — or outside of — manufactured home communities.

MMarkWeissManufacturedHousingAssociationForRegulatoryReformMHARRPostedIndustryVoicesMHProNews

The headline and this graphic are produced and provided by MHProNews, a common practice among some in media to illustrate opinion or ‘letters to the editor’ columns.

They, and a lot of other Americans living in the heartland of the country, deserve better than this type of arrogant slander. ##

MMarkWeissCEO-MHARR-ManufacturedHousingAssociationforRegulatoryReform-posted-IndustryVoices-MHProNewsMark Weiss
President & CEO
Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR)
1331 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Suite 512
Washington, D.C. 20004
Phone: 202/783-4087
Fax: 202/783-4075
Email: MHARRDG@AOL.COM

(Editor’s Note 1: Weiss’ comments are made with respect to a tweet by Keith Olbermann, published in an article on Washington, D.C.’s ‘The Hill,” see link here, or at the top, above.

Note 2: MHProNews contacted several top people at the Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI), as well as their media contact, to give them an opportunity to share a comment or respond. As of this time, As of this time, more than 48 hours later, they have not done so.)

Industry Should Stay the Course in Duty to Serve Efforts

February 10th, 2017 1 comment

I appreciate the way that MHAAR respectfully criticized my commentary on the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s (FHFA’s) final rule to implement the “Duty to Serve” (DTS) requirements as being “far too charitable,” but the criticism was misdirected.  My comments neither praised nor denigrated the FHFA for the DTS final rule.

I learned early in my career that you play the hand that you’re dealt.  Sometimes you’re in a strong position and other times you’re not.  The situation dictates your actions and response.

With respect to DTS, the industry was not dealt a strong hand, but I am proud of the way the industry responded.  Because of that, the industry is closer today than at any time in recent years to getting a pilot program for chattel manufactured home loans through the Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs), Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

The FHFA made up its mind a long time ago that it didn’t have the legal authority to require the GSEs to create a secondary market program for chattel manufactured home loans.  Whether this is true or not doesn’t make a difference for all intents and purposes.

JimAyotteFMHAManufacturedHousingIndustryVoicesDutyToServeGSEFHFA-MHProNews

I agree with MHAAR that “If Congress had meant the “Duty to Serve” to be optional, it would not have called it a “Duty.”

But anyone involved with laws and regulations for any length of time understands that laws are not always black and white.  In fact, many times they are not.

For arguments sake, let’s say that the law specifically requires the GSEs to create a loan program for chattel manufactured homes.  Where does that get us? The industry could spend tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars and years litigating this point.  Even if the industry prevailed, the GSEs would still be in the driver’s seat.  They could create a program that satisfies the legal requirements, but is so safe and sound that it is impractical and unusable.

The only way for the industry to get the GSEs to create a secondary market program for chattel manufactured home loans is to convince them that it is good business and the right thing to do.

This requires a different approach than continually chastising the FHFA for not mandating the GSEs to create a secondary market program for chattel.

MHARR does an excellent job as the industry’s conscience.  MHARR serves an important role in forcefully and articulately weighing-in on every proposal that adversely affects the industry.  But, this is only one element of a strategy, not the whole strategy.  In this situation, a different approach is needed and that approach is to continue doing what we’re doing.

We were all disappointed that it took nine years from the date of enactment of the DTS legislation to get a proposed rule and we were even more disappointed when the proposed rule did not provide “Duty to Serve” credit for chattel loans.  The silver lining was that it was a catalyst for industry members to submit over 3,100 comment letters to the FHFA.  Those letters certainly got the attention of the FHFA and the GSEs.

As a follow-up, the FHFA held an unprecedented public hearing last April to receive input from the industry on how to structure a successful chattel loan program.  The hearing was not to hear testimony on why a chattel program was needed, that fact was already established from the volume of public comments submitted.

The industry’s efforts resulted in a final rule that opened the door a crack by providing the GSEs “Duty to Serve” credit for purchasing manufactured housing loans, but not mandating that they do so.  Considering where we started from in December 2015, the final rule shows the positive impact that an industry can have when its members are engaged and energized.

The FHFA scheduled three “listening sessions” in January and February of this year to take additional testimony from industry stakeholders. This indicates that the FHFA and the GSEs have an interest in exploring the possibility of creating a secondary market for chattel manufactured home loans.

The most important development over the past thirteen months has been the GSEs meeting with industry stakeholders. The meetings started last spring and are continuing today.

The GSEs have shown a genuine interest in understanding today’s chattel housing market. Industry representatives have made a concerted effort to educate the GSEs about chattel manufactured homes and available loan products, and to understand the GSEs concerns, offer suggestions and convey a willingness to be open to new requirements.

From where I sit, all parties are working hard to try to develop a pilot program for chattel manufactured home loans.  I am optimistic that it will become a reality if we continue doing exactly what we’re doing.  ##

jimayottefloridamanufacturedhousingassociationfmha-industryvoices-manufacturedhousingindustrycommentary-mhpronewsJames R. Ayotte, CAE
Executive Director
Florida Manufactured Housing Association
1284 Timberlane Road
Tallahassee, FL  32312