Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Ohio’

Richard William Pettet Dies in Manufactured Home Installation Tragedy

December 6th, 2017 Comments off

FirefightersWorkUnderManufacturedHomeSlippedBlocksVintonCourierHeatheWillardDailyBusinessNewsMHProNewsRichard William Pettet of McArthur, Ohio man was killed Monday afternoon when a manufactured home he was working on crushed him, after slipping off its blocks.

Richard Pettet was pronounced dead at the scene,” per the Vinton Courier

The incident involved a new home he was installing at 63718 Route 50, with us son, per the Vinton County Sherriff’s Office.

Fire department, Vinton County EMS, Vinton County Sheriff’s Office and rescue workers responded to the scene, located near Vinton County Middle School and the intersection with Locker Plant Road.

VintonCountyOhioSceneOfAccidentTragicDeathGoogleMapsDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

The fire department is actually trained in order to do that type of close-quarter rescue,” Lt. Bill Bowden said.

Bowden said this wasn’t the first such tragedy in recent years.

RichardWilliamsPettetManufacturedHousingIndustryProfessionalDiesTragedyDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

Richard was a member of Laborers Union 423, the McArthur VFW, and the McArthur Eagles.

His parents, sons, James (Holly) Pettet of Wilkesville and Timothy Pettet of The Plains; grandchildren, Jaclyn, Logan and Ellie; brother, Roger Pettet of Cincinnati; his friend, Lisa Bay and the mother of his children, Rebecca Pettet of Zaleski were among the survivors.

FirefightersAccidentSceneManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

Funeral services will be held 1 p.m., Thursday, December 7, 2017 in the Garrett-Cardaras Funeral Home, 201 W. High St., McArthur, with Rev. Bob Jividen officiating.

Black_ribbon Rest in Peace wikimedia commons

Rest in peace.

MHProNews extends its sincere condolences to all who are touched by the loss.

May Richard William Pettet rest in peace. ## (Passages, obituary.)

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

SoheylaKovachManufacturedHomeLivingNewsManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews-Submitted by Soheyla Kovach to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.com.

Challenges Loom for Ohio MHC Residents

June 2nd, 2017 Comments off
ChallengesLoomforOhioMHCResidentscreditWDTN-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews2

Homes in the Glen Acres community. Residents have 180 days to vacate. Credit: WDTN.

As the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA) wages a battle in the state capital for manufactured home owners, residents of a community in Fairborn face an uncertain future.

According to WDTN, residents of the Glen Acres Mobile Home Park have been notified that they need to find a new place to call home.

Earlier this week, residents were served notices to vacate the property pending the sale of the land to the city of Fairborn “for a use other than as a manufactured mobile home park.”

The notice told residents that they have 180 days to vacate the property, and was sent by current owners McNamee & McNamee, PLL.

Obviously relocating your manufactured home and belongings will entail significant expense,” the notice read.

In order to ease that transition the City of Fairborn has agreed to provide you with $2,500 in financial assistance upon the condition that your relocation is accomplished no later than 180 days after you receive this notice.”

ChallengesLoomforOhioMHCResidentscreditWDTN-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews1

Credit: WDTN.

When questioned, the city provided their view regarding responsibility.

The city has been engaged in negotiations to purchase the park [sic] however, no deal has been finalized,” said Fairborn Assistant City Manager Michael Gebhart.

It will probably likely be September or October before we would close if everything goes through. If it does, we would make available $2,500 to each property owner to help with their move.”

While city officials and the community owners work on the details, some residents are making their feelings known.

This is not a time that I need to be worrying about where I’m going to live,” said resident Patricia Ann Collins, who says she’s dealing with being handicapped and having heart issues.

ChallengesLoomforOhioMHCResidentscreditWDTN-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews3

Resident Patricia Collins. Credit: WDTN.

At this point, it looks like I’m going to have to move into a tent.”

Having been a resident since 1986, Collins says she feels like an afterthought.

It makes me feel like anyone that lives in a mobile home [sic] is always looked down on to begin with and him not calling back makes me feel like I’m a piece of trash,” said Collins.

Another resident, who chose to remain anonymous, also pointed out an issue with some of the older homes.

You can’t relocate a 25-year-old trailer [sic]. The axle and everything underneath is too old. None of the companies around here are willing to do it.”

ChallengesLoomforOhioMHCResidentscreditGoogle-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Fairborn, shaded in red. Credit: Google.

Gebhart says that it will be taxpayer money that is used to relocate resident’s homes, and that the city will not purchase the land unless residents are gone.

It’s called a mobile home [sic] for a reason. Not to be insensitive, but for us to put up $2,500 to help with that move, that’s the most we can do,” said Gebhart.

 

Terminology Matters

As Daily Business News readers are already aware, terminology matters, and the comment by Gebhart provides another example of how long standing stereotypes and misconceptions are simply regurgitated.

For example, in a recent story on the differences between mobile and manufactured homes, MHProNews asked Urbana, Ohio Fire Chief Mark Keller to clarify details on a recent home fire reported in his town.

This fire involved a true mobile home and was not a manufactured home. I do not have the age of the mobile home available right now,” Urbana Fire Chief Mark Keller told MHProNews.

Mobile homes are inherently bad with fire conditions. They’re not really designed to withhold any kind of fire.”

Chief Keller was specific, because MHProNews directly inquired about the facts of the case, which allowed MHLivingNews to properly represent the facts of that sad incident.

But how can doing that correct-the-record once or occasionally be enough in the face of the thousands of such stories being reported a year?

For more on other communities throughout the U.S. in similar circumstances, including the case of the Lowry Grove community just outside of Minneapolis, click here. ##

(Editor’s Note: An in depth report on this topic of terminology and its impact on manufactured housing was posted by RC Williams this week, and published yesterday, at this link here. Publisher’s note, don’t miss this RC Williams report and analysis, take the time to digest the link below yourself, and then share it with others.)

Schooling Public Officials, Media on Trailers, Mobile Homes, Tiny Homes, and Manufactured Homes

SchoolingPublicOfficialsOnTrailersHousesMobileHomesTinyHousesManufacturedHomesMHLivingNews

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

 

(Copyright Notice: This and all content on MHProNews and MHLivingNews always have been and are Copyrighted, © 2017 by MHProNews.com a dba of LifeStyle Factory Homes, LLC – All Rights Reserved. No duplication is permitted without specific written permission. Headlines with link-backs are of course ok. A short-quoted clip, with proper attribution and link back to the specific article are also ok – but you must send a notice to iReportMHNewsTips@mhmsm.com of the exact page you’ve placed/posted such a use, once posted.)

Drama in Ohio: Fake News, Facts and Myths

April 26th, 2017 Comments off
DramainOhioFakeNewsFactsandMythscreditMediaNation-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Media Nation.

The ongoing battle between the Ohio Manufactured Housing Association (OMHA) and Ohio Governor John Kasich over the status of the Ohio Manufactured Housing Commission (OMHC) has been taken to a whole new level, with what informed sources  are calling “fake news.”

According to a story from WOSU, Gov. Kasich wants to merge the OMHC with the Department of Commerce, which includes the fire marshal’s office.

As Daily Business News readers are already aware, The Ohio Fire Chief’s Association sent a letter to lawmakers at the end of March supporting a provision in the state budget to kill the commission. The Daily Business News covered the response from the commission in a story linked here.

Commentary from the association, and the state fire marshal, was inflammatory.

30 people died in 1,208 manufactured home fires between 2012 and 2016,” said the letter from the Association.

OhioManufacturedHomesAssociationCallsforHelpcreditOMHA-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: OMHA.

Ohioans are 4.2 times more likely to die in a manufactured home that caught fire than one- or two-family home,” said state Fire Marshal Larry Flowers, who cited a four-year study of state data showing there are more fatal fires in manufactured homes in Ohio than in any other surrounding state.

OMHA Executive Director Tim Williams fired back, calling out the association on their “facts,” pointing out the facts versus myths surrounding manufactured homes and fires, noting that homes built under post-1976 federal regulations have the same rates in this area as traditional homes.

tim williams exev vp ohio mfg homes assoc

Tim Williams, OMHA.

The administration is spreading false information and misleading information because the commission is pushing back against Kasich’s proposal,” said Williams.

Local or state fire officials have no authority to inspect or educate or require different fire codes for manufactured homes.”

Williams has also testified extensively before three different House of Representatives Finance Committees.

The Swamp has risen up against our residents and industry. OMHA and AMHRO have united on behalf of our residents and businesses to oppose the Ohio Department of Commerce’s extravagant request for spending authority of 30% more to conduct the same program,” said Williams.

Incredibly, the Department of Commerce not only wants more money but would drastically reduce the Commission’s 100% inspection of all new and used home installations, thus jeopardizing the safety of our homeowners and residents.”

 

Terminology Matters 

In a recent story from the Daily Business News about mobile and manufactured home myths and facts, we shined a bright light on the differences between mobile and manufactured homes, and why terminology matters.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokeFireChiefMarkKellerCreditUrbanaFireDivision-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Chief Mark Keller. Official Photo.

This fire involved a true mobile home and was not a manufactured home. I do not have the age of the mobile home available right now,” Urbana Fire Chief Mark Keller told MHProNews.

Mobile homes are inherently bad with fire conditions. They’re not really designed to withhold any kind of fire.”

As an Industry, we are always saddened to hear of such tragedies such as the fire that occurred in Champaign County,” said OMHA Assistant Director Andrea Reichman, commenting on the story.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditLinkedInAndreaReichman-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Andrea Reichman. Credit: LinkedIn.

As noted by the local Fire Chief Mark Keller, the home involved was a ‘mobile home,’ which indicates the home was built prior to the 1976 HUD Code Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards,” Reichman said.

Often times such incidents are reported inaccurately, and facilitate the image that manufactured homes are not safe when nothing could be further from the truth.  Manufactured homes are no more prone to fire than homes built on-site. The 1986 national fire safety study by the Foremost Insurance Company showed that site-built homes are more than twice as likely to experience a fire than manufactured homes,” said Reichman.

The issues in Ohio point to a larger trend that’s happening nationally, and the Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR) has spoken out against what it calls “sloppy journalism.”

While any harm to people or property is regrettable, there is no excuse for sloppy journalism that can harm the industry and consumers. The fact is that today’s federally regulated manufactured homes are as safe or safer than other types of homes when it comes to fire, as shown by research done by the National Fire Protection Association on multiple fire safety metrics,” said M. Mark Weiss, JD, President CEO of MHARR.

m_mark_weiss_mharr_pesident__mhpronews__credit

M. Mark Weiss. Credit: MHProNews.

It is therefore misleading and a disservice to readers to fail to distinguish between pre-1976 ‘mobile homes,’ said Weiss, and today’s manufactured homes. This is why MHARR successfully demanded several years ago that the U.S. Fire Administration remove similarly misleading language from it’s website. 

The industry and consumers need to insist on an accurate media portrayal of today’s high-quality manufactured homes,” said Weiss.

For more on the battle between the Governor’s office and OMHA over the OMHC, click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews

City Adopts Manufactured Housing Ordinance, Terminology Matters

April 10th, 2017 Comments off
CityAdoptsManufacturedHousingOrdinanceTerminologyMatterscreditWisconsinDepartmentofProfessionalServices-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Wisconsin Department of Safety Professional Services.

In Groesbeck, Texas the city council passed an ordinance that makes a distinction between manufactured and mobile homes.

According to the Groesbeck Journal, the passing of the ordinance reflects the members’ consensus from a workshop on the subject that they held in early March.

As informed veteran manufactured housing professionals and enthusiasts know, HUD Code manufactured homes that are properly installed and maintained have a similar life expectancy as conventional housing. Any housing that is not, for whatever reason, properly maintained tends to fall into disrepair and can deteriorate more rapidly, and thus, shorten its useful life expectancy.

CityAdoptsManufacturedHousingOrdinanceTerminologyMatterscreditBestPlacestoLive-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Best Places to Live.

By contrast, pre-HUD Code mobile homes were not routinely built to those same standards. Even so, millions of mobile homes have gone years beyond their projected useful life expectancy.

The council said that the distinction between the two are important, because the term “mobile home” is often used in common parlance to refer to manufactured homes built before and after the defining 1976 date.

The city’s ongoing efforts to regulate manufactured housing have caused some people to believe the city is prohibiting all manufactured housing, regardless of age.

 

Terminology Matters 

In a recent story from the Daily Business News about mobile and manufactured home myths and facts, we shined a bright light on the differences between mobile and manufactured homes, and why terminology matters.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokeFireChiefMarkKellerCreditUrbanaFireDivision-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Chief Mark Keller. Official Photo.

This fire involved a true mobile home and was not a manufactured home. I do not have the age of the mobile home available right now,” Urbana Fire Chief Mark Keller told MHProNews.

Mobile homes are inherently bad with fire conditions. They’re not really designed to withhold any kind of fire.”

As an Industry, we are always saddened to hear of such tragedies such as the fire that occurred in Champaign County,” said Andrea Reichman, Assistant Director of the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA).

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditLinkedInAndreaReichman-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Andrea Reichman. Credit: LinkedIn.

As noted by the local Fire Chief Mark Keller, the home involved was a ‘mobile home,’ which indicates the home was built prior to the 1976 HUD Code Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards,” Reichman said.

Often times such incidents are reported inaccurately, and facilitate the image that manufactured homes are not safe when nothing could be further from the truth.  Manufactured homes are no more prone to fire than homes built on-site. The 1986 national fire safety study by the Foremost Insurance Company showed that site-built homes are more than twice as likely to experience a fire than manufactured homes,” said Reichman.

The issue in Ohio points to a larger trend that’s happening nationally, and one industry organization cites frustration with “sloppy journalism.”

m_mark_weiss_mharr_pesident__mhpronews__credit

M. Mark Weiss. Credit: MHProNews.

While any harm to people or property is regrettable, there is no excuse for sloppy journalism that can harm the industry and consumers. The fact is that today’s federally regulated manufactured homes are as safe or safer than other types of homes when it comes to fire, as shown by research done by the National Fire Protection Association on multiple fire safety metrics,” said M. Mark Weiss, JD, President CEO of the Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR).

It is therefore misleading and a disservice to readers to fail to distinguish between pre-1976 ‘mobile homes,’ said Weiss“and today’s manufactured homes. This is why MHARR successfully demanded several years ago that the U.S. Fire Administration remove similarly misleading language from it’s website. 

The industry and consumers need to insist on an accurate media portrayal of today’s high-quality manufactured homes,” said Weiss.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditNFPAMHLivingNews-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: MHLivingNews.

For more on from the NFPA report on fire safety of modern manufactured home compared to conventional housing and mobile homes, click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Manufactured Home Commission Under Fire, After Fire

March 30th, 2017 Comments off
OhioManufacturedHomesAssociationCallsforHelpcreditOMHA-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: OMHA.

A recent manufactured home fire in Urbana, Ohio, has officials across the state calling for bold action.

Their target is the Ohio Manufactured Homes Commission.

According to the Dayton Daily News, fire officials across Ohio are backing a proposal by Governor John Kasich to abolish what they call an “industry-controlled agency that regulates manufactured homes,” saying the commission does too little to protect manufactured home residents from deadly fires.

The Ohio Fire Chief’s Association sent a letter to lawmakers last week supporting a provision in the state budget to kill the commission and roll its functions into the Ohio Department of Commerce. The Daily Business News covered the response from the commission in a story linked here.

30 people died in 1,208 manufactured home fires between 2012 and 2016,” said the letter from the Association.

Ohioans are 4.2 times more likely to die in a manufactured home that caught fire than one- or two-family home.”

The Ohio Manufactured Homes Commission is responsible for licensing inspectors across the state, who oversee the installation of about 3,000 homes a year. It also regulates the state’s 1,600 manufactured home communities. The commission has oversight from a nine-member board, which is appointed by the Governor and the Ohio General Assembly.

For its detractors in the state, the Commission also has its supporters.

I believe wholeheartedly, whether I sit on the commission or not, it’s one of the best things that’s happened to the manufactured home community in Ohio,” said Evan Atkinson, general manager of Clayton Homes in Frazeyburg and a commissioner on the board.

Since the commission was created, the number of complaints about mobile home installation has plummeted from hundreds to a number you can count on one hand. What’s proposed now is to fragment it and stick it back out into deep bureaucracy.”

Atkinson says that the commission currently requires inspection of every single home installed in Ohio, and points out that it’s a commitment the Department of Commerce has not made.

I believe there’s a probably a good likeliness that homes may not be installed as well as they are currently being installed,” said Atkinson.

leadingcauseshousefiresscreditstoveguard-postedmhlivingnews0

Credit: Stoveguard, MHLivingNews.

As Daily Business News readers are already aware, we have pointed out the facts versus myths surrounding manufactured homes and fires, pointing out that homes built under post-1976 federal regulations have the same rates in this area as traditional homes.

Ohio Fire Marshal Larry Flowers insists that moving the inspection and licensing of manufactured homes into the Department of Commerce, where his agency is, will allow them to coordinate better on fire prevention.

What we believe is that there just needs to be more oversight and transparency in the process when these things are inspected initially,” said Flowers.

This will allow us to work more closely together with our partners in the department of commerce.

But Atkinson says that working more closely together isn’t an issue.

If that is a major concern, the folks within the commission would be more than willing to work with the state fire marshal as well,” said Atkinson.

The commission would welcome the opportunity to work with the state fire marshal and be able to get 100 percent of manufactured homes inspected and installed properly.” ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Land Bank Pursues Tax Delinquent Manufactured Homes

March 10th, 2017 Comments off
LandBankGoesAfterTaxDelinquentMHcreditWSAZ-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

An unrelated home secured by the land bank. Credit: WSAZ.

In Lawrence County, Ohio, the county land bank is making a very strong statement with regard to manufactured homes that are delinquent on their taxes.

According to an editorial board letter in the Ironton Tribune, the land bank is looking to clean up abandoned and run-down properties across the county, but a federal rule is in the way.

There is one area where their hands are tied, and this is on properties with manufactured or mobile homes [sic],” said the letter.

Roughly 30 percent of all properties in the county and a quarter of those properties targeted by the land bank are categorized as mobile homes [sic], and account for $1 million annually in unpaid property taxes.

While the land bank can normally proceed with the process of cleanup, rules with regard to manufactured housing throw a wrench into that process.

Federal rules prohibit the use of federal funds earmarked for land bank demolition to be used on mobile homes [sic], even if they have been modified and attached to a permanent foundation,” said the letter.

LandBankGoesAfterTaxDelinquentMHcreditWRLandconsvervancy-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: WR Land Conservancy.

Per the Ironton Tribune, former Cleveland City Councilman Jim Rokakis urged the Lawrence County Land Bank to reach out to Ohio senators and urge them to change the restriction.

As a community, the cleanup of these properties that, in many cases, become havens for squatters or drug activity along with other potential hazards shouldn’t be treated any differently,” the letter said.

The only way this will change is through legislation at the federal level, and voicing your opinion or asking questions of your legislators is a responsibility we all share as residents.

 

LandBankGoesAfterTaxDelinquentMHcreditGoogle-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Lawrence County, shaded in red. Credit: Google.

Officially created in July 2016 with a $4.325 million grant from the Ohio Department of Housing, the Lawrence County Land Bank secured residential and commercial abandoned, dilapidated or tax delinquent properties with the goal of getting them back on the tax rolls.

More coverage on the Lawrence County Land Bank from MHProNews contributor Matthew J. Silver is linked here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Ohio Manufactured Homes Association Calls for Help

March 7th, 2017 Comments off
OhioManufacturedHomesAssociationCallsforHelpcreditOMHA-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: OMHA.

The Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA) tells MHProNews that the Ohio General Assembly House of Representatives Finance Committee is currently reviewing proposed language in House Bill 49.

The bill proposes to abolish the Ohio Manufactured Homes Commission, delivering a potentially devastating setback to the industry in the state.

If the Commission is abolished, the Ohio Department of Commerce would regulate the industry in the state, resulting in bureaucratic delays, according to the OMHA .

The organization is asking for help from those in the state of Ohio, by calling and emailing state representatives and urging them to contact members of the House Finance Committee.

OMHA has set up links for ease of use in making contact and spreading the word.

You can have an email letter sent on your behalf here, or you can go here and enter your zip code to get contact information for representatives in your area to call.

A script that can be utilized is linked here.

As Daily Business News readers already know, the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA) is a not for profit organization whose strategic vision strives to make manufactured housing a standard way of life in Ohio.

For additional commentary from OMHA Executive Director Tim Williams, including his take on actions by President Donald Trump that affect the manufactured housing industry, click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News, MHProNews

Decisions in CFPB Appeal

February 8th, 2017 Comments off
DecisionsinCFPBAppealcreditHousingwireCFPB-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credits: Housingwire, CFPB.

A major blow was delivered to those who were working to defend the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) last week, when a federal appeals court denied their motions.

According to Pay Before, the same three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit that determined the CFPB structure was unconstitutional in October 2016, denied appeals in the PHH Corp. vs. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau case.

In the decision, which was covered by the Daily Business News here, the court determined the CFPB is controlled by a “single, unaccountable, unchecked director, Richard Cordray, who can only be removed for just-cause, which poses the risk of arbitrary decision-making and abuse of power compared to a multimember independent agency.

CarsonApprovedbySenateCommitteeProvidesViewonMHcreditSherrodBrownOfficialPhoto-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Senator Sherrod Brown. Official photo.

The circuit court ultimately ruled that the CFPB could continue operating, but that the director can now be replaced at will.

Recent motions filed by U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), argued that Congress wanted a single director for the agency, because lawmakers who drafted the Dodd-Frank Act, which established the CFPB, “understood that the nation needed a regulator that could respond quickly and effectively to new threats to consumers … and it knew that the CFPB’s effectiveness could be hampered by the delay and gridlock to which commissions are susceptible.

CordrayDefiantSaysTrumpWon’tChangeAgencycreditWikipediaMaxineWaters-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Representative Maxine Waters. Credit: Wikipedia

Sixteen state attorney generals and the District of Columbia also filed a motion, defending the CFPB in its current incarnation.

As the representatives of millions of citizens across the country, the state attorneys general have used their express statutory authority to bring civil actions to enforce consumer financial protection laws and to pursue regulatory actions in coordination with the CFPB to protect consumers against unfair, deceptive and abusive financial practices,” the motion said.

The current ruling, if permitted to stand, will undermine the power of the state attorneys general to effectively protect consumers against abuse in the consumer finance industry.

Public interest groups, including the Americans for Financial Reform, Center for Responsible Lending, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, and Maeve Brown, chairperson of the CFPB’s consumer advisory board also filed a joint motion in support of the CFPB, which they decided to do after President Trump put the organization, and Dodd-Frank, in the crosshairs for major changes.

President Trump has voiced strong opposition to the Dodd-Frank reforms that created the CFPB,” according to the group’s motion.

IDontThinkThereWasEverMuchHighCostLendingInTheManufacturedHousingMarket-stillcreditCSPAN2--RichardCordrayCFPBdirector-Posted-MHLivingNews-com-

Still from an Inside MH video, reflecting how Richard Cordray himself said that there was never much high cost lending in the manufactured housing industry market. Click here or on the picture above for the full story.

President Trump started the process of dismantling Dodd-Frank in an executive order signed on February 3rd.

Following the court’s October panel decision that the CFPB structure is unconstitutional, the bureau filed a petition in November for a rehearing before the entire appellate court.

Had the circuit court granted the motions last week to intervene, the groups would have been able to submit briefs supporting the CFPB’s structure in the event of a rehearing of the case.

TheFateoftheCFPBWhatWillTrumpDocreditwikipedia-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

President Barack Obama announces the nomination of Richard Cordray as the first director of the CFPB on July 18, 2011. Credit: Wikipedia.

According to one attorney, that would have been unprecedented.

In my entire career, I have never heard of someone trying to intervene at the Court of Appeals level related to a petition for rehearing,” said Alan S. Kaplinsky, partner, Ballard Spahr LLP.

PHH sued CFPB Director Richard Cordray after the agency issued an order against the lender for $109 million over an alleged kickback scheme around reinsurance payments. The CFPB accused PHH of referring customers to mortgage insurers who, in turn, bought reinsurance from one of PHH’s units.

The Daily Business News will continue to follow developments around the CFPB and update this story as information becomes available. ##

(Image credits are as shown above.)

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Mobile, Manufactured Home Fire Myths go Up in Smoke

February 2nd, 2017 Comments off
MobileHomeUpInSmokeMobileManufacturedHousingIndustryNewsMHProNewsURbanOhioMobileHomeFire420x373

Text graphic, MHProNews, original photo, Springfield News Sun.

A tragic event in Champaign County, Ohio, on Monday shined a bright light on the differences between mobile and manufactured homes, and why terminology matters.

The mobile home fire left Kalleen Emmons, 23, in critical condition and Robert Garringer, 31, in serious condition. Two children were also injured.

According to the Springfield News-Sun, which did not reply to MHProNews requests for clarification on the type of home involved in the blaze, firefighters were dispatched to the scene Monday at 12:15 a.m.  There they discovered the four victims, who had already escaped from the burning home, thanks to a smoke alarm.

The four were transferred by ambulance to Springfield Regional Medical Center.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokeFireChiefMarkKellerCreditUrbanaFireDivision-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Chief Mark Keller. Official Photo.

This fire involved a true mobile home and was not a manufactured home. I do not have the age of the mobile home available right now,” Urbana Fire Chief Mark Keller told MHProNews.

 

 

Mobile homes are inherently bad with fire conditions. They’re not really designed to withhold any kind of fire.

Chief Keller said that the home was a total loss and the fire also damaged siding on the home next door.

Usually once a window is broken out, it spreads very quickly throughout the rest of the trailer [sic]. And that’s pretty much what we had happened.

manufacturedhomeNotMotorHomeNotTrailerNotMobileHome-NFPA-FARreportOnManufacturedHousingFires-posted-MHLiivingNews-com-

The NFPA clearly understands the importance of proper terminology, as the clip from their Manufactured Homes Fires report, makes clear. As an editorial point, one of many reasons that MHProNews and MHLivingNews stress the value of precise terminology is because while some older mobile homes were built to better standards, many other pre-HUD Code mobile homes were not. The HUD Code – which starting June 15, 1976 established tough federal safety, energy and construction standards – resulted in a home building process that performs dynamically as well (or better) than conventional housing for about half the cost, according to third party studies; including the NFPA.  These HUD Code homes should only be referred to in reports as a manufactured home, or manufactured housing.

UpInSmokeMobileManufacturedHousingIndustryNewsUrbanaOHfireMHProNews

Terminology Matters

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditLinkedInAndreaReichman-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Andrea Reichman. Credit: LinkedIn.

As an Industry, we are always saddened to hear of such tragedies such as the fire that occurred in Champaign County,” said Andrea Reichman, Assistant Director of the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA).

 

As noted by the local Fire Chief Mark Keller, the home involved was a ‘mobile home,which indicates the home was built prior to the 1976 HUD Code Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards,” Reichman said.

Often times such incidents are reported inaccurately, and facilitate the image that manufactured homes are not safe when nothing could be further from the truth.  Manufactured homes are no more prone to fire than homes built on-site. The 1986 national fire safety study by the Foremost Insurance Company showed that site-built homes are more than twice as likely to experience a fire than manufactured homes,” said Reichman.

About 20 percent of all MH are pre-HUD Code mobile homes, so, the balance would be manufactured homes.

While many ‘mobile homes’ are replaced every day some still exist. OMHA was encouraged to hear that the home had smoke detectors that were activated during the fire. The industry encourages homeowners to install and test their smoke detectors monthly per the recommendation of the National Fire Protection Association for all residential properties,” she told MHProNews.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditNFPAMHLivingNews-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credits: MHLivingNews, NFPA.

As Daily Business News readers are already aware, a “mobile homehas not been built in the U.S. since June 15th 1976, the day the first federally regulated manufactured homes began to the sounds of nail guns and saws in production centers from coast to coast.

National View on the MH Fire Issue

M_Mark_Weiss_MHARR_president__mhpronews__credit postedDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

For “A Cup of Coffee With…” MHARR president and CEO M. Mark Weiss, click here or on the photo. Credit: MHProNews.

While any harm to people or property is regrettable, there is no excuse for sloppy journalism that can harm the industry and consumers. The fact is that today’s federally regulated manufactured homes are as safe or safer than other types of homes when it comes to fire, as shown by research done by the National Fire Protection Association on multiple fire safety metrics,” said M. Mark Weiss, JD, President CEO of the Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR).

Weiss’ comments to the Daily Business News raises an important point.

Namely, that “sloppy journalism” can be harmful to the proper image and understanding of manufactured homes.  That in turn arguably harms manufactured home owner’s values.  Inaccurate media coverage also deters some would-be home buyers of manufactured housing, who might otherwise purchase one; if they realize how safe, appealing, energy-efficient, and affordable contemporary manufactured homes are.

Those lost new and pre-owned MH sales opportunities cost the industry’s businesses money, and workers better-paying job opportunities.

It is therefore misleading and a disservice to readers to fail to distinguish between pre-1976 ‘mobile homes,’ said Weiss, “and today’s manufactured homes. This is why MHARR successfully demanded several years ago that the U.S. Fire Administration remove similarly misleading language from it’s website. 

The industry and consumers need to insist on an accurate media portrayal of today’s high-quality manufactured homes,” said Weiss.

An industry wag told the Daily Business News that it’s inaccurate reporting that should go up in smoke – because compared to other forms of housing – modern manufactured homes more rarely do.  Still, prudent precautions such as smoke detectors ought to be followed, along with other safety steps reported in detail at this link here.

For more on the NFPA report on fire safety of modern manufactured home compared to conventional housing and mobile homes, click here. ##

(Image credits are as shown above.)

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Carson Approved by Senate Committee, Provides View on MH

January 24th, 2017 Comments off
CarsonApprovedbySenateCommitteeProvidesViewonMHcreditNewsMax-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Ben Carson taking the oath at his confirmation hearing. Credit: Newsmax.

The Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee has unanimously approved Dr. Ben Carson for Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD.) His nomination now heads to the full Senate for a vote.

Manufactured housing also took center stage, as the Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI) tells MHProNews that Senator Dean Heller (R-Nevada) asked Dr. Carson to describe in writing his view of the role of manufactured housing in the provision of affordable housing in rural areas.

 

I do see manufactured housing playing an important role in providing affordable housing in rural areas. I think it’s important to ensure HUD’s policies promote access to this valuable resource,” said Carson.

CarsonApprovedbySenateCommitteeProvidesViewonMHcreditHellerOfficialPhoto-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Senator Dean Heller. Official photo.

After the vote by the senate, Carson will inherit an agency with 8,300 employees and a budget of about $47 billion.

According to WWLP, Committee Chairman Michael Crapo of Idaho praised Carson and his impressive career.

CarsonApprovedbySenateCommitteeProvidesViewonMHcreditMikeCrapoWikipedia-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Senator Michael Crapo. Credit: Wikipedia.

HUD will benefit from having a secretary with a different perspective and a diverse background,” said Crapo.

The committee advanced Carson’s nomination in a simple voice vote without major opposition from Senate Democrats, who are fighting other appointees of President Trump.

Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio, the leading Democrat on the panel, said he was supporting Carson because of his commitments to address lead hazards, uphold fair housing laws and advocate for rental assistance, despite his reservations.

CarsonApprovedbySenateCommitteeProvidesViewonMHcreditSherrodBrownOfficialPhoto-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Senator Sherrod Brown. Official photo.

I would not have chosen him because of his lack of experience and his often troubling public statements over the last three years,” said Brown.

But despite my reservations and my disagreements with some of his positions, I’ll give Dr. Carson the benefit of the doubt.”

Prior to the vote, Brown proposed unsuccessfully that the committee begin requiring Cabinet-level nominees to submit three years of tax returns before confirmation hearings.

Republicans opposed the change.

Our extensive coverage on the nomination and confirmation of Dr. Ben Carson includes four former HUD Secretaries endorsing Carson and an open letter from MHProNews and MHLivingNews Publisher L.A. “Tony” Kovach.

The letter from Kovach is linked here. ##

(Image credits are as shown above.)

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.