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Pros and Cons of Licensing, How Government Regulations Can Harm Job Creation

May 25th, 2017 Comments off
ProsandConsofLicensingHowGovernmentRegulationsCanHarmJobCreationcreditYouTube-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Does over regulation create a caption may I environment? Credit: YouTube.

In the U.S., a number of professions and businesses are regulated to varying degrees. While some are obviously necessary, others present questions – and responses – from individuals and businesses alike, who wonder if having to play the game of “captain may I?” is meant to help or hurt them.

Research from the Brookings Institute takes a look at the logic, and the lack of it in some instances, as it relates to licensing.

It is important to realize that occupational licenses are not mere state-sponsored certificates to signal that workers have completed some level of training; occupational licensing laws forbid people from practicing in their occupation without meeting state requirements,” the Institute said in a report.

If the rationale for licensing an electrician is to protect public safety, it is difficult to see what rationale supports licensing travel guides. Yet, twenty-one states require a license for travel guides. Among these, Nevada has created the highest hurdle: a person hoping to be a travel guide in that state must put in 733 days of training and shell out $1,500 for the license.”

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Credit: Brookings Institute.

Then, there’s the other side.

There can be an obvious disconnect between the strictness of licensing regulations and the potential harm to consumer safety. For example, Michigan requires 1,460 days of education and training to become an athletic trainer, but just 26 to be an emergency medical technician (EMT). In fact, across all states, interior designers, barbers, cosmetologists, and manicurists all face greater average licensing requirements than do EMTs,” said the institute.

According to the Washington Times, special-interest groups often promote state licensing to benefit themselves at the expense of entrepreneurs, small-business owners and consumers.

And, it seems that this problem has exploded.

The percentage of U.S. workers who need government permission to practice their occupation has grown from 5 percent in the 1950s to nearly 30 percent today. Studies suggest this has caused 2.8 million fewer jobs in our economy and more than $200 billion in additional annual costs for consumers.

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The Brookings Institute study shows a state-by-state breakdown of licensing and implementation. Credit: Brookings Institute.

The Times points to an instance in Oregon, where licensing requirements can be enforced in ways that are unjust, and in the case of a licensing board just downright bizarre.

Recently, an Oregon resident spoke out publicly about the timing of the traffic lights in his city after his wife received a red light camera ticket. Based on calculations he had performed, he argued that the yellow light was too short.

For his trouble, he reportedly earned a $500 ticket from the state board of engineers for “the unlicensed practice of engineering.”

 

A Look from the Manufactured Housing Industry

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Credit: Bloomberg.

As Daily Business News readers are already aware, job creation and economic growth are regularly noted in quarterly reports as a factor in manufactured housing sales. The adverse effects of regulation were pointed out in 2015, when award-winning writer Jan Hollingsworth recounted the story of the older gentleman, likely a farmer, in bib overalls who visited a manufactured home dealership in Kentucky.

After two hours of perusing the possibilities of different homes, he chose one. But when he asked the salesman for help in filling out the finance application, he was told federal regulations prevent manufactured home retailers from assisting customers. The man left, unhappy, and later found a salesman elsewhere who was willing to break the rules to provide the old farmer with what may be the house of his dreams.

The story highlights the incongruities written into the Dodd-Frank Act, and enforced by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

He wasn’t asking the salesman to do anything that a real estate agent doesn’t do every day. It just makes no sense at all,” said Barry Noffsinger, a regional manager for CU Factory Built Lending, one of the nation’s leading MH lenders.

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Barry Noffsinger, photo credit, MHProNews.

With compliance costs quadrupling in recent years for MH lenders, as Don Glisson, Jr., CEO of Triad Financial Services says, many small banks, credit unions and other MH lenders have shuttered their MH lending operations, leaving prospective buyers to rely on high interest loans, or else continue renting. ##

 

 

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

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RC Williams, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

 

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“Flat-Pack” Modular Homes Proposed to Help Solve Housing Crisis

December 9th, 2016 Comments off
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The urban bungalow. Credit: UK Mirror.

Not unlike the U.S., the United Kingdom is the midst of a housing crisis, due in part to rising housing costs and lack of skilled construction workers. Willerby Innovations believes they have the answer.

The firm is touting their sustainable modular home, known as the “urban bungalow,” as completely constructed in the factory and can be built in a day for about £60,000 ($75,432 USD).

The urban bungalow can help the government hit its targets while providing jobs locally,” said Phil Parks, lead commercial manager at Willerby Innovations.

The latest government initiatives continue to focus heavily on long-term goals including its ambitious target to build one million new homes by 2020. But even with initiatives in place to help housing associations and developers build more homes, it still doesn’t address today’s pressure on local authorities to meet the immediate social needs. Action needs to be taken now.

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Credit: Willerby Innovations.

According to the UK Mirror, there are more than 72,000 families living in temporary accommodation, including disabled or elderly residents struggling to live in high-rise buildings, with their caregivers forced into bed and breakfast accommodations.

There are thousands of people at risk of homelessness in the UK with this predicated to rise sharply creating a growing demand for housing from the elderly, the vulnerable and the temporary homeless,” said Parks.

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Inside of the urban bungalow. The design is similar in some ways to single sectional manufactured homes. Credit: UK Mirror.

The homes come with the option of furniture already included, have a large kitchen, living and dining room as well as a family-sized bathroom and are built to last 60 years.

The Daily Business News has covered the U.K. housing crisis, and potential solutions extensively, including the Farmer Review, which called prefab housing the “true way forward.” That story is linked here. ##

(Image credits are as shown above.)

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RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

As Government Grows, Regulations Impose, the Economy Slows

June 16th, 2016 Comments off

regulatory_costs_incurred_during_construction__nahb__3_2016Saying people have forgotten President Reagan’s line: “The government is not the solution, it is the problem.” The larger the government grows, the slower the economic growth, writes Richard W. Rahn in washingtontimes.

The article MHProNews posted June 9, 2016 reports Donald Trump promises to end Dodd-Frank and its chokehold regulations through the CFPB that have all but ended financing options for the least expensive manufactured homes (linked here).

Oppositionally, Hillary Clinton promises to keep Dodd-Frank, likely beef it up, and oppose HR 650/S682.

Meanwhile, Rahn writes, At some point, economic growth is so slow that despite high levels of taxation and spending, the long-term situation gets worse rather than better for most people. The United States has suffered wage stagnation under the Obama administration, even with a huge growth in government spending and regulation,” he says.

A longtime supporter of the Center for Freedom and Prosperity (CFP), which supports global tax competition and smaller government, Rahn’s vision is for less tax-and-regulatory grab.

He says Dan Mitchell, chairman of the CFP board quotes former Michigan Democratic Senator Carl Levin (1979 to 2015) who said the CFP’s “activities run counter to America’s values and undermine the nation’s ability to raise revenue,” as tax receipts during his tenure skyrocketed from $463 billion to $3.2 trillion. Levin complained it was not enough, regardless of the economic and social damage it caused.

The two percent growth rate of the majority of the world’s developed economies is not sufficient to raise the standard of living for most people, and it is directly related to too much government regulation.

For most countries the optimum size of government is probably around 25 percent of GDP. The U. S. is at 42, Singapore and Hong Kong are around 18 percent while Switzerland is at 33. The last three mentioned entities all have per capita incomes higher than America, long life expectancy and medical care, a narrative that advocates of more government do not like to hear.

Reagan’s words echo again. Rahn: “This was never truer than today. Governments around the world are crushing economic growth and opportunity, and destroying basic liberties. This will not change until knowledgeable people bust the false narrative that more government will make things better.”

For MHARR’s Mark Weiss’ spearing take on over reaching regulations in the MH industry, click here. ##

(Graphic credit: National Association of Home Builders, March 2016)

matthew-silver-daily-business-news-mhpronews-comArticle submitted by Matthew J Silver to Daily Business News-MHProNews.