Archive

Posts Tagged ‘British Columbia’

Another Manufactured Home Community Hit by Disaster

May 31st, 2017 Comments off

An unrelated home in Olalla, British Columbia, Canada. Credit: Mitula.

In Olalla, British Columbia, Canada, a 55 and over manufactured home community finds itself suffering from the effects of flooding.

And, some residents say that the issue stems from lack of attention.

We’d be spared from flooding if they dredged that creek,” said resident Margaret Munn. Munn, along with other residents, feel the provincial government should do more to protect them.

According to Global News CA, resident Jim Stewart was forced to trek through his neighbor’s yard and climb through a fence to access his flooded home. Due to the flooding, he’s been put up at a hotel for the next week thanks to area emergency services.

The community also sits on a flood plain… and residents say this is unlike anything they’ve ever seen before.

A few of these mobile homes [sic] are wrecked right now, we’ve had it, they are flooded right out,” said Stewart.

The high water has flooded at least four mobile homes [sic].”

With the flooding, residents are having to decide whether to stay or go.

Mom called me up hysterically that the driveway is under water,” said resident Jamie Walker, who expressed concern about the well being of his 60-year-old mother.

It’s just the worry that the water is going to encroach on further property and create damage and more headaches.”

creditGoogle-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Olalla (red marker). Credit: Google.

Elef Christensen, representative and Area G Director for the area, pointed to heat as the culprit.

The snow is melting up in Apex and it’s coming down to Keremeos Creek,” said Christensen.

Christensen did not provide a timeline for cleanup, next steps, or additional resources for the community residents.

 

Flooding Impacts on Manufactured Home Communities

The Daily Business News has covered scenarios similar to the one in Olalla, British Columbia recently, including the case of Riviera Estates in Eagle, Idaho, where officials were working to pump water out of the community’s shed pumps, which provide potable water to residents.

According to KBOI, residents were forced to evacuate due to floodwaters that initially spread two to three feet, then several more feet in the span of one day.

They’re going to still have to release more water, more water means deeper flood water,” said J.R. Schooley, who is working with a family to move out of the community.

Deeper flood water means there’s a point where you can’t get out of here and that’s what we worry about the most, you get to a point where it’s two, three feet deep.”

For more on manufactured home communities dealing with the effects of flooding, including those at the Balls Ferry Fishing Resort and Mobile Home Park in Anderson, California, click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

 

(Copyright Notice: This and all content on MHProNews and MHLivingNews always have been and are Copyrighted, © 2017 by MHProNews.com a dba of LifeStyle Factory Homes, LLC – All Rights Reserved. No duplication is permitted without specific written permission. Headlines with link-backs are of course ok. A short-quoted clip, with proper attribution and link back to the specific article are also ok – but you must send a notice to iReportMHNewsTips@mhmsm.com of the exact page you’ve placed/posted such a use, once posted.)

Manufactured Homes Repurposed in Costly Housing Market

May 31st, 2017 Comments off
creditPressDemocrat-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

An unrelated manufactured home in Sonoma County, California. Quality and affordability are keys to housing those in need. Credit: Press Democrat.

In a story that the Daily Business News originally covered here, the Village Mobile Home Park in Sebastopol, California is going to help provide housing to those who are at risk of, or are already, homeless.

Back in March, the city committed to invest $258,000 into the project to create a mix of affordable manufactured homes and apartments.

According to the Press Democrat, the community was purchased by the city 10 years ago, and has partially emptied out over time as the adjoining Laguna de Santa Rosa campground was closed and converted to parkland, with the intention the remainder of the property eventually be turned over to recreational use, as well.

But an agreement between the city of Sebastopol and the non-profit agency West County Community Services will utilize the community to provide housing to between eight and 12 additional people and families who are in need.

West County Community Services has also committed to provide a case manager and support services to any current or new residents who want help learning to manage and stabilize their lives, connecting them with treatment, health services or food programs.

CityInvestsinManufacturedHomesforAffordable HousingcreditSonomaWest-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Sonoma West.

The idea, of course, is to help them move up and onward,” said Tim Miller, executive director of West County Community Services.

But they can stay as long as they want.”

But, even with the dollar committed, the project will still be dependent on the ability and willingness of charitable residents to donate eight usable manufactured homes, although four units have already been acquired.

Organizers say they are hoping for the donation of a used construction unit that can be employed as a classroom, social service office and meeting place for the community.

Then there are the challenges facing the city.

The loss of campground revenue and diminished manufactured home occupancy forced the city to operate the community at a deficit approaching $75,000 a year, mostly for site and property management, while considering future options.

Even so, city officials have increasingly been reluctant to do anything that would eliminate a local source of low-cost housing that has no emergency shelter, and happens to be one of the most expensive places to live in the country.

sebastopolcacreditGoogle-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Google.

The new plan is a win-win,” said Gale Brownell, a longtime Sonoma County housing advocate and member of the Group of Advocates in west Sonoma County.

While Brownell was instrumental in bringing the players together to develop the plan for Village Mobile Home Park, she gives credit to a Sebastopol woman named Darrin Batch, a regular at City Council meetings, and well-informed about city policies and budgeting.

She thought that was a terrible thing, given the fact that people were homeless,” said Brownell.

Currently, 65 people currently reside in the 18 home community.

And for 48-year resident Marjorie Wallace, age 90, knowing that there’s some stability is a huge relief.

Two of her sons, now in their late 50s, live with her. A third, who has cancer, is with her as well.

All are partly dependent on my Social Security income, so the uncertainty about what would happen if the park closed has been profound,” said Wallace.

For more on manufactured housing providing quality, viable solutions for those in need, including recent cases in Hawaii and British Columbia, Canada, click here and here. ##

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

 

(Copyright Notice: This and all content on MHProNews and MHLivingNews always have been and are Copyrighted, © 2017 by MHProNews.com a dba of LifeStyle Factory Homes, LLC – All Rights Reserved. No duplication is permitted without specific written permission. Headlines with link-backs are of course ok. A short-quoted clip, with proper attribution and link back to the specific article are also ok – but you must send a notice to iReportMHNewsTips@mhmsm.com of the exact page you’ve placed/posted such a use, once posted.)

MHC Expansion Proposal Makes Progress

May 1st, 2017 Comments off
bigmapleshome1creditremax-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

A home in Big Maple. Credit: Remax.

In a story that the Daily Business News originally covered last October, the Sechelt, British Columbia council has given second and third readings to a proposed community plan and zoning amendments for expansion of the Big Maple Mobile Home Park.

According to the Coast Reporter, developer Chapman Creek Holdings Ltd. wants to rezone two lots adjacent to Big Maple Mobile Home Park to R-5, a designation that would expand the park by 1.55 hectares to accommodate about 28 additional manufactured homes.

Back in October, directors with the Sunshine Coast Regional Districts’ (SCRD) planning and community development committee in British Columbia, Canada addressed a referral from Sechelt on the expansion, which was met with a positive response.

I really wish that people would search out locations in OCPs where mobile home parks [sic] could go in, because it is one solution for people to have affordable housing,” said Lorne Lewis of Elphinstone, who is also a big proponent for manufactured housing as an affordable option.

During the readings, Sechelt Mayor Bruce Milne pulled no punches.

We plan to apply tough environmental standards to the project,” said Milne.

We need to hold the mitigating geotechnical and environmental factors to the highest standards. The district wants to use standards set by its own Water Resource Center for design of the mobile park’s [sic] new sewer system. The standards of Vancouver Coastal Health and the Ministry of Environment may be considerably lower.”

mhexpansionwelcomedaspositiveaffordablehousingoptionbigmaplesonmapcredtigoogle-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Big Maples (red marker). Credit: Google.

At a March 22nd public hearing on the matter, members of the public expressed concerns about potential flood hazards, loss of wildlife habitat and impacts from traffic.

Complaints about a recurring smell from the original Big Maple wastewater treatment plant were also expressed, but Milne says that the new owners have committed to installing a new system and connecting all of the current homes to bring the community up to standard.

It will be an overall improvement,” said Milne.

Council member Noel Muller agreed, and also spoke to the need for affordable housing.

There were a lot of things to weigh for this, such as what’s going to happen to Chapman Creek. That hinges on the septic system,” said Muller.

We have a desperate need for affordable housing in this district and that’s why I’m voting in favor.”

The council did not provide additional details on next steps regarding the proposal during the readings, but the Daily Business News will continue to monitor its progress. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

More First Nations Turning to Modular

April 27th, 2017 Comments off
MoreFirstNationsTurningtoModularcreditCBC-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Modular homes being moved into place on the Yale First Nation. Credit: CBC.

Throughout Canada, many First Nations native tribes are struggling with the dual challenge of quality, and affordable, housing.

Mold and other natural elements, when combined with overcrowding, present issues tribal members call a “sad reality.”

The solution, they believe, lies in modular housing.

According to the CBC, the Yale First Nation in British Columbia has started to move forward with utilizing modular, with Britco in to construct six new family units.

With the ability to heat the homes for much less, and the homes being able to last longer, utilizing them was an easy choice, especially as older homes were falling apart.

They were dilapidated, one was condemned and demolished and the other cost us $100,000 just to renovate,” said Crystal Sedore, Yale First Nation’s housing manager.

The Yale First Nation homes were built using what’s known as passive technology, in which the units face the sun, have thicker walls and multiple layers of insulation, which lowers heating bills by as much as 80 percent. Heat from stoves and dryers are also recycled to heat the rest of the homes, which are airtight.

Members of the Yale First Nation started to move into the homes on April 1st.

As far as we’re aware, this is the very first passive house built on a reserve,” said Sedore.

The results, so far, are positive. The nation is so pleased that four additional homes are now being constructed.

kashechewanfirstnationreturnhomenewmodularhousingwelcomesthemcreditcbc2-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: CBC.

The Daily Business News has covered a number of stories about First Nation’s utilizing modular housing, including the case of the two-and-a-half-year saga for the Kashechewan First Nation of Northern Ontario.

In December, eight families started moving back into new modular homes delivered over the summer.

Families were expected to continue to return through the winter and spring months with all 104 modular homes full by August 2017.

The plan is to fly a handful of families back to Kashechewan every few weeks, with the goal of having everyone home by the end of the summer,” said Kapuskasing fire chief Gerry Desmeules.

When they left Kashechewan two and a half years ago now, they basically left with a small duffle bag with some clothes. They’ve basically rebuilt their memories and all their personal property and stuff while they were here in Kapuskasing.

The full story is linked here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews

UPDATE: MHC Future in Doubt, the Other Side of Rent Control

April 26th, 2017 Comments off
UPDATEMHCFutureinDoubttheOtherSideofRentControlcreditWesternInvestment-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Resident Lothar Netzel having a garage sale. Credit: Western Investor.

In an update to the story that the Daily Business News originally covered here, residents at the Thetis Lake Campground community in View Royal, British Columbia, Canada, are facing an imminent threat.

According to Western Investor, assessments on the community are threatening the viability of the most affordable housing option in the province, and options are limited.

 

Manufactured homes on rented pads cost about one-tenth of what an average detached house in B.C. costs, and provide thousands of seniors and others with the lowest-cost homes in the province,” said Al Kemp, executive director of the Manufactured Home Park Owners Alliance of BC.

canadianmillennialswaryofmanufacturedhomeaffordabilityalkepcreditlinkedin-postedtodailybusinessnews

Al Kemp. Credit: LinkedIn

And the security of low cost is in doubt because park owners are under annual rental restrictions while assessed values, and subsequent property taxes, are increasing dramatically.”

Kemp says that owners are being squeezed, as assessment values on manufactured home communities have skyrocketed over the past year, but community owners can only increase site rents by 3.7 percent this year under the Residential Tenancy Act.

BC Assessment doesn’t have a clue how to value manufactured home parks [sic], which are a hybrid of commercial and residential real estate,” said Kemp.

The land-value sale of one park [sic], for example, will raise the assessed value of neighboring parks [sic] that may not have the same development potential.”

A community owner in Vancouver reached out to Kemp for help after receiving their 2016 assessment.

We will be out of business soon as our low rent-controlled increases never allow us to catch up,” said the owner.

MHCResidentsFaceUncertainFuturecreditMobileHomesVictoria-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnewsMHCResidentsFaceUncertainFuturecreditMobileHomesVictoria-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

A home at Thetis Lake Campground. Credit: Mobile Homes Victoria.

This has community owners beginning to scramble to sell, which means residents are scrambling to find a new place to live. And that’s the case with Thetis Lake – the community’s assessment jumped more than $400,000 in the past year, to $2.98 million.

The owner is now in the process of selling to a developer who wants to build 45 single-family homes and 14 townhouses on the property. And residents are facing eviction next fall.

We don’t want to leave. It’s basically cheap living, close to a park and we’re comfortable here,” said resident Lothar Netzel.

With the average price of a detached house in View Royal at $645,000, a townhouse at $502,000, and a vacancy rate less than one percent, affordable housing for community residents is far from certain.

The sale of the community is hinging on the development being approved for rezoning by the Town of View Royal. If it goes through, the owner of the community has offered each homeowner $10,000 as compensation.

And that has not set well with residents.

What can we do with $10,000?” asked Netzel. “Look at the steep house prices and a tight rental market throughout the capital region.”

The impact of rent control has been felt in other parts of Canada as well, including the case in the video above with a community in Manitoba.

David Screech, Mayor of View Royal says that while he sympathizes with the owners, View Royal does not have any manufactured home bylaws.

In my opinion, they have been given a generous offer, more than what’s required by law,” said Screech.

 

Is Rent Control Necessary? MH Industry Experts Speak 

sam-landy-ceo-umh-posted-manufactured-housing-industry-communities-retailing-postedDailyBusinessNews-MHProNews-

Sam Landy, UMH President and CEO.

UMH would not buy a rent controlled community and believes all community owners should work with residents to avoid rent control,” said Sam Landy, President and CEO of UMH Properties, Inc.

The fact is if we raise our rents too high we will have no sales and no occupancy. No reasonable landlord would do such a thing. Our rents have to make economic sense or we have no business. Therefore, in the long term, there is never a need for rent control.” 

Sam Landy’s full commentary on rent control is linked here.

RentControlManufacturedHomeCommunitiesPaulBradleyROCUSA_postedIndustryVoices-ManufacturedHousingIndustryMHProNews--e1474054729300

Graphic credit, MHProNews, statement by Paul Bradley,
ROC USA, in a longer post, found at this link here.

c-william-bill-dahlin-hartkinglaw-postedmanufacturedhousingindustryvoicesmhpronews-1

C. William “Bill” Dahlin.

The entire objective of rent control is to distort the market and have a government agency decide what rent is appropriate,” said C. William Dahlin, JD of Hart | King Law.

Such governmental controls never lead to more housing or better housing.” 

 

For more opinions on the impacts of rent control in the U.S., click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

 

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews

Move to Reclassify RV’s In Community

April 13th, 2017 Comments off
MovetoReclassifyRVstoProtectResidentscreditPeaceArchNews1-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Peace Arch News.

In Surrey, British Columbia, Canada, a move by the owners of the former Seacrest Motel and RV Park to redevelop was met with strong opposition. Interestingly, the opposition didn’t come from residents.

According to Peace Arch News, Lark Group, the owners of the community want to redevelop the land into 21 single-family lots.

During the third reading of the application last week during a meeting, 31 people opposed the move, but only one Surrey resident spoke against the application.

The heart of the opposition appears to be around the need to protect residents of the RV community, where a majority of the residents are permanent. Last August, year round residents were given eviction notices and told that they had one month to vacate.

The city needs to adjust its manufactured home park redevelopment policy to classify recreational vehicles as manufactured homes if used as a primary residence,” said Grant Rice, a self describe concerned citizen who previously ran for city council and mayor.

Shortly after the eviction notice was provided, South Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner said city staff advised the Lark Group to obtain a ruling from the Residential Tenancy Branch (RTB), which would determine if the RVs could be considered manufactured homes, which would afford the RV owners more benefits.

Regulations in the province require that manufactured home community residents be given one year’s notice of the final moving date, from the time that approvals are granted. They are also entitled to the equivalent of one year’s worth of site rent.

Residents of Seacrest started a committee to take the issue through the RTB process, but after six months, they agreed to accept a settlement package from the Lark Group before a ruling was made.

According to Rice, the residents felt as if their choices were limited.

MovetoReclassifyRVstoProtectResidentscreditPeaceArchNews2-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Grant Rice speaking at the reading. Credit: Peace Arch News.

One of the problems is you’re asking people who are already stressed and on the verge of being evicted from their home to go to the RTB and roll the dice on whether or not they’re going to get a favorable ruling,” said Rice.

Prior to a vote on the matter, Councilwoman Vera LaFranc stated that she was initially concerned about the displacement of low income residents, and thanks both city staff and the Lark Group for their handling of the process.

We saw that people were treated with respect and that’s what we would expect to see in (the) future if there are any development applications on manufactured homes and that would also include those that are tourist accommodation,” said LaFranc.

The council then approved the application.

As Daily Business News readers are aware, redevelopment, for any number of reasons, is a natural course of business, and most owners and operators follow rules and standards to the letter. This includes assistance for residents, and opportunities to purchase the community, including the case of residents in Dover Point, New Hampshire, who purchased their community right before Christmas. That story is linked here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

MHC Residents Face Uncertain Future

February 16th, 2017 Comments off
MHCResidentsFaceUncertainFuturecreditMobileHomesVictoria-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnewsMHCResidentsFaceUncertainFuturecreditMobileHomesVictoria-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

A home at Thetis Lake Campground. Credit: Mobile Homes Victoria.

In the town of View Royal, British Columbia, the potential sale of a community, and developer plans, have residents wondering about their next move.

According to the Gold Stream Gazette, Eric Gieringer and his family have owned Thetis Lake Campground for the last 41 years.

On January 12th, Gieringer sent a letter to the community’s 17 homeowners that stated his desire to retire and sell the property, and that he has entered into a property sales agreement with a developer who plans to submit a rezoning application to the Town of View Royal in the near future.

Should the rezoning application fail,said Gieringer in the letter,the tenancy for the mobile home owners [sic] in the park [sic] will still end and the campground will evolve to fall in line with its current zoning, which is for temporary use and tourism, not permanent residency.

If the property is successfully rezoned, Gieringer has offered $10,000 to any tenant that agrees to completely vacate the property by the end of September.

If residents choose to remain, they will receive the minimum according to the British Columbia Tenancy Act, which is 12 months of the current monthly rent, and be given an extra year to leave.

Residents Lothar Netzel and Jacquelynn Starck say they are not surprised.

MHCResidentsFaceUncertainFuturecreditGoldStreamGazette-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Lothar Netzel in front of his home. Credit: Gold Stream Gazette.

Rumors have been going around for years,” said Netzel.

In fact, since 2000, any new tenant arriving on the property has signed a letter indicating that the tenancy might end due to rezoning or a transition into a more traditional campground.

Other residents are also concerned about the lack of affordable housing, as British Columbia has some of the highest costs in the nation.

 

This news has stressed people out …They are getting rid of the last affordable housing in Victoria,” said Karen Hayes.

It’s impossible. The rents are up to $900 to $1,200,” said Starck.

The application to have the property rezoned is still in its early stages and hasn’t been officially received by the Town of View Royal.

The council will have to weigh its options with regards to potential development of the property, and that its close proximity to a nature park means we’ll be looking for dedicated park land and proper buffers as part of any proposal,” said Mayor David Screech.

MHCResidentsFaceUncertainFuturecreditOfficialPhoto-DavidScreech-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Mayor David Screech. Official Photo.

He also sees both sides of the situation.

I respect the owners’ right that they have decided that they just don’t want to run the park [sic] anymore. So unfortunately what’s happening with the tenants is a by-product of that,” said Screech.

Gieringer also understands, but says he has been upfront all along.

I’m not happy about it. It’s not the way I thought this would all end, but we’ve been very frank with all of our tenants that we really saw no future the way this business model is,” said Gieringer.

For more on the housing situation in British Columbia, and manufactured housing as a proposed solution, click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Top Prize for Residential Modular Visionary

January 30th, 2017 Comments off
TopPrizeforResidentialModularVisionarycreditVancouverSun-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

A look at the award winning modular vision. Credit: Vancouver Sun.

A vision for modular housing has made a huge impact at the recent STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) Spotlight Awards in Vancouver, Canada.

According to the Vancouver Sun, British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) civil engineering student Stephen Cohos won the $20,000 grand prize during the inaugural edition of the awards event for his vision of sustainable modular housing.

My main interest is in modular building systems, but we can also make buildings that sequester carbon from the atmosphere rather than create it in the production of cement,” said Cohos.

TopPrizeforResidentialModularVisionarycreditSTEMSpotlightAwards-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: STEM Spotlight Awards.

Cohos presented the Amoeba Building System to judges, which is a modular building system that can be used to create large multi-unit residential buildings composed almost entirely from wood, with the goal of solving the Vancouver area-housing crisis.

Cohos says that the individual living units are called “Unit Cells” which can be assembled on site from prefabricated wall and floor panels, and then stacked like Lego bricks to match the shape and topography of a building site.

It really speeds up the time needed for construction,” said Cohos.

Right now I am designing an eight-story building, but we are hoping to go up to 15 or 20 floors.

The STEM Spotlight Awards is a first-of-its-kind competition in Canada, challenging individuals aged 18 to 28 to present solutions to real-world problems in five major sectors of the British Columbia economy using STEM skills (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math).

 

The MH Industry and STEM

clayton_bradley_stem_academy__thedailytimes__credit

Credit: The Daily Times.

As Daily Business News readers are aware, Clayton Homes has established the Clayton-Bradley Academy, a STEM school located on the grounds of Clayton’s Maryville, Tennessee headquarters, with the goal of preparing students for college, as well as being a community resource and part of a bigger conversation about education.

clayton_bradley_stem_academy___sarah_herron__knox_news_credit

Patricia Bradley and Kevin Clayton. Credit: Knox News.

With rapid expansion since its July 2013 opening, Executive Director Patricia Bradley believes that the school is uniquely positioned to help students and businesses alike.

Business partnerships are critical. The business community is telling us that students aren’t career-ready, and our goal is to produce students who are ready to go to college and universities and be prepared for the work force. We want to make the transition as smooth as possible,” said Bradley.

 

Clayton Homes is a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway (BRK/A), and is the largest producer of manufactured homes (MH) in North America. Vertically integrated, the company has several hundred retail centers nationwide. Through its affiliates and family of brands, Clayton builds, sells, finances, leases and insures Clayton-built manufactured and modular homes.  The operation also buys products and uses services from other producers.

For the most recent closing numbers on all Berkshire Hathaway – and all MH industry-connected tracked stocks – please click here. ##

 

(Image credits are as shown above.)

 

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Modular Building Helps Native American First Nations Solve Housing Challenges

January 11th, 2017 Comments off
ModularHelpsFirstNationsSolveHousingChallengescreditBritco-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Britco.

For many among the member of the “First Nations” in Canada, quality affordable housing is a persistent challenge. The Yale First Nation in British Columbia knows this all too well, having to work to provide housing that meets the challenge of standing up to cold weather without being too expensive.

According to The Tyee, the Yale Nation receives a maximum of $169,000 from the federal government to build a house. That’s enough for a single-family, wood-frame house or, as Yale First Nation Chief Ken Hansen calls them, “B.C. box houses.

These homes can take six to 12 months to complete, and with frequent rains delays even though the homes meet basic code structure, their quality often leads to challenges including mold.

These challenges led the Yale Nation to Britco, a Langley, British Columbia-based modular building company.

Yale contracted with the company to build 10 two-bedroom modular units in a pair of buildings that meet high-efficiency “Passive House” design requirements.

For us, the appeal was not only are we being environmentally conscious, which is very important to our chief and council,” said Crystal Sedore, housing manager for the Yale First Nation.

But also to build housing that is beyond minimal acceptable standards. We want something better, and our membership deserves better.

Passive House homes are designed to be so energy-efficient that they are able to stay warm at 62 degrees with residents’ body heat, energy from the sun, and by turning on the lights.

Passive Housing relies on strict construction standards and material specifications to ensure as little heat seepage as possible, and housing can be completed in 30 days.

Britco says that their previous Passive House project, located in Bella Bella, B.C., takes as much energy to heat on the coldest day of the year as turning on six 100-watt incandescent light bulbs.

For the Yale Nation, that means cost savings.

ModularHelpsFirstNationsSolveHousingChallengescreditTheTyee-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Modular units in progress. Credit: The Tyee.

We’re looking at hydro bills estimated to be $10 to $20 a month for heating and electricity” in these new units,” Sedore said.

Yale says it will track the units energy use and share the data, providing a valuable test case for modular Passive House designs in other communities, regardless of whether or not they’re Indigenous.

I’m hoping to lead by example,” said Chief Hansen. ##

(Editor’s Note: The Daily Business News has covered a number of First Nation stories, including the Kashechewan First Nation returning to their land, with new modular housing to welcome them. That story is linked here.)

(Image credits are as shown above.)

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

Explosion at Manufactured Home Community Injures Resident

December 1st, 2016 Comments off
explosionatmanufacturedhomecommunityinjuriesresidentcreditpentictonwesternnews-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: Penticton Western News.

Dorothy Czerniak, a resident of Sun Leisure Mobile Home Park in Penticiton, British Columbia is a lucky woman.

Czerniak narrowly escaped serious injury when what is believed to be an explosive device wrapped as a Christmas present exploded as she was opening it Wednesday morning.

She suffered minor burns and singed hair, but was not taken to the hospital.

It was on purpose, there was wires soldered to a nine-volt battery and a safety pin as a secondary clip,” said Don Czerniak, who is Dorothy Czerniak’s son. “I was just driving out of the park [sic] and dad phoned me up and I pulled over and dad goes ‘come home right away a bomb just exploded in my house.’ Now they’re just treating the site carefully, afraid it might have had some hazardous material. They said they had to treat it as a worst case scenario.

According to Penticton Western News, multiple ambulances and other emergency vehicles responded to the call around 10 a.m. at the manufactured home community located just west of the intersection of Channel Parkway and Skaha Lake Road.

Another community resident said she observed firefighters being sprayed with some material afterwards.

A young boy who lives nearby first saw the package on the ground in front of a cube van parked at his parent’s residence.

explosionatmanufacturedhomecommunityinjuriesresidentcreditcbc-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credit: CBC.

He picked it up and took it to mom and dad. He figured, being older they just dropped it,” said Don. “Mom looked at it and couldn’t see anything and so she took the wrapping off to see if she could find something on it so she could return it and she went to open up the package and it blew up.

Don said that he didn’t know who would want to harm his parents, who were the previous caretakers at Sun Leisure.

They know everybody here,” said Don. “With the exception of the odd drug thing we never have any problems at this park [sic]. I told the cops this is just something you see on the news from Timbuktu, not Penticton. Mom is just glad it wasn’t a little kid.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) held a press conference on Wednesday afternoon, but details remained scant.

explosionatmanufacturedhomecommunityinjuriesresidentcreditinfoca-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Corporal Don Wrigglesworth. Credit: InfoCa.

We’re awaiting the arrival of our explosives disposal unit as well as our forensic IED section to examine the scene, so the matter is still under investigation at this time,” Corporal Don Wrigglesworth said. “We have one explosives disposal unit in British Columbia, and they’re coming up from Vancouver.

Wrigglesworth could not comment on whether or not there were any leads on who may have sent the package, which he said was left outside of the home, nor could he say whether the boy who allegedly left the package with Dorothy Czerniak had been interviewed.

At this time, our general investigation section is canvassing neighbors and they’re talking to witnesses,” he said. “We don’t know at this time who left the package outside of the residence.

Wrigglesworth worked to assure residents that this was an isolated incident.

At this time this is a solitary incident, I want the public to feel assured that our police and all our resources that we have available are on scene and we are investigating,” he said. “We have had no other reports of anything of this nature.” ##

(Image credits are as shown above.)

rcwilliams-writer75x75manufacturedhousingindustrymhpronews

RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.