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Manufactured Housing Association Benefits Survey

September 26th, 2017 Comments off
AndreaReichmanAstDirectorOhioManufacturedHomesAssociation

Photo provided by Andrea Reichman upon MHProNews request.

The Ohio Manufactured Home Association (OMHA) tells MHProNews about their new survey of members that asks some key questions, including:

  • what association benefits do you currently use,
  • and what benefits would you like to see that aren’t currently offered?

This is an interesting topic for consideration, not just for OMHA, but for any association – or potential association.

P.E.P. = The Heart of a Good Association?

An award-winning association executive told MHProNews some time ago that every good association focuses on three core principles:

  • Protect,
  • Educate, and
  • Promote.

P.E.P.ProtectEducatePromoteMHProNews

Beyond those 3 core focal issues, the OMHA survey asked their members about the following:

OMHAMembershipBenefitsSurvey2017-09-25_2033

OMHAMembershipBenefitsSurvey2017-09-25_2034

Credit, OMHA.

MHProNews would be interested in hearing from not only OMHA members, but that of any association on what benefits professionals believe are the most useful in the manufactured housing industry.  While it may include those items noted above, there are numerous others that could be mentioned too.

IReportMHNewsTips@MHMSM-comMHProNews

To report a news tip, click the image above or send an email to iReportMHNewsTips@mhmsm.com – To help us spot your message in our volume of email, please put the words NEWS TIP in the subject line.

Please use the link above for News Tips and include in your subject line, “Good MH Association Benefits.” ## (News, Analysis.)

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

SoheylaKovachManufacturedHomeLivingNewsManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews-Submitted by Soheyla Kovach to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

 

 

 

Are Mobile Home Fires Burning the Manufactured Housing Industry?

May 10th, 2017 Comments off
AreMobileHomeFiresBurningtheIndustrycreditKatzFinancial-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Passing the torches image credit, Katz Financial. Text graphic, by RC Williams/Daily Business News.

The battle between the office of Ohio Governor John Kasich and the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA) over the Ohio Manufactured Housing Commission (OMHC), shined a bright light on a large, ongoing challenge related to the industry and terminology.

When you type “mobile home fires” into Google, you get over 3 million entries, perhaps spanning the life of the internet. These include studies on causation, injuries, deaths, dollars, etc. — not just the fires alone.

Those millions of stories provide one of the striking reasons why the public impression about ‘mobile homes’ is so poor.  Years of media accounts about mobile homes burning are seared into the public’s minds.

Over3MillionHitsonMobileHomeFiresGoogleSearchPostedDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

On 5.10.2017 at 2:11 ET, there were over 3 Million ‘hits‘ on Mobile Home Fires in this Google Search. Posted on the Daily Busines News, MHProNews.com.

Conflating fire risks in pre-HUD Code mobile homes with manufactured homes

marty-lavin-jd-manufacturedhomefinanceexpert-DailyBusinessNews-mhpronews

Marty Lavin, JD.

are one of several possible examples of what Marty Lavin, JD –  industry communities, retail and finance veteran calls “the other industry image campaign.”

That negative stereotypes mainstream media “campaign” is waged by locals – who for whatever reasons – fail to report information accurately.

That in turn naturally spills over into the public’s impression of manufactured homes.

While the public is clamoring for affordable housing – and the need is in the tens of billions annually – it seems that fears about fires are among the reasons they don’t turn to manufactured homes more often as their solution.

LindseyBostick-SunshineHomesManufacturedHousingIndustryDailyBusinessNewsMHProNewsAs a result, a recent Zillow report indicates that only about 8% of shoppers are ‘considering’ a mobile or manufactured home, and only about half of those end up purchasing.  Yet, as Credit Human’s Barry Noffsinger – or millenial and manufactured home owner, Lindsey Bostick of Sunshine Homes – have told MHProNews, the description of what people are looking for fits well with what today’s manufactured homes offers.

The challenge is, that millions seeking housing just don’t consider it.  Per Zillow’s survey, half that do, buy.

Fire-Heated Questions

OldHouseOnFireCreditYouTube-postedDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

Every year, there are older conventional housing units that burn. Does that cause an outcry against conventional building? No. Similarly, when older mobile homes burn, it should not impact the image of modern manufactured homes. Sadly, though,
it does. Image credit: YouTube still.

The “burning question” is how many of these fires occurred in pre-HUD Code homes, and how many in manufactured homes?

Surprisingly, the exact answer is not known. But the reason that it’s unknown is sadly clear.

Many if not most news reports do not distinguish between mobile and manufactured homes. The absence of that distinction – and poor use of terminology in other stories – thus feeds into a myth that continues to plague the contemporary manufactured housing industry.

That in turn leads millions to incorrectly believe that all factory-built homes have the same old (high) risk of fire that mobile homes built 40 years ago did.

The Daily Business News has periodically pointed out the facts versus myths surrounding manufactured homes and fires, noting that homes built under post-1976 federal regulations have a somewhat lower fire rates than a traditional, site-built house.

TerminologyMattersBecausetheTerminologyDescribestheConstructionStandardsHomeBuiltToSteveDukeLMHAaMHLivingNewsMHProNewsBiggerPocketsSunshineHomesRedBayAL

The terminology matters because the terminology determines the construction standards a home was built to,” said Steve Duke, LMHA.

An Example of The Impact on the MH Industry

As noted, Ohio is an example where poor information created industry challenges, because the opposition claims run counter to the facts.

The Ohio Fire Chief’s Association’s letter to lawmakers in March supported a provision in the state budget to kill the Ohio Manufactured Home Commission (OMHC), proposing to roll its functions into the Ohio Department of Commerce.

The Daily Business News covered the response from the commission in a story, linked here.

30 people died in 1,208 manufactured home fires between 2012 and 2016,” said the letter from the fire chief’s association.

Ohioans are 4.2 times more likely to die in a manufactured home that caught fire than one- or two-family home.”

AreMobileHomeFiresBurningtheIndustrycreditNFPA2-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Manufactured homes are far safer than mobile homes, per the NFPA. To see the report, click the graphic above for the story and attached documents, available as a download.

But that statement by the fire chief’s association was inaccurate, as a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) study reflected.

The NFPA also carefully noted the proper and improper use of nomenclature, see that graphic below.

http://www.mhmarketingsalesmanagement.com/blogs/daily-business-news/big-win-for-omhaomhc-in-house-senate-vote-next/

Publisher and consultant Tony Kovach stresses that facts like the above must become second nature for industry professionals to know, link to and otherwise share. “It’s the industry that has the motivation to educate the public on the realities vs. the old facts or myths,” says Kovach. “The rewards and profits are going to those who take part in those educational efforts, and who make a difference in their own marketsThat educational effort benefits home owners too.  Manufactured home owners could enjoy faster resale and higher resale values.  Home buyers, renters, job creation…virtually everyone in the mix can benefit by dispelling the myths and dated relaties.”

Ohio Manufactured Home Association (OMHA) Executive Director Tim Williams and Association of Manufactured Home Residents in Ohio (AMHRO) President Frank Pojman joined forces to point out the facts to their legislators.

That “teaming up” is critical, because arguably home owners’ property values are negatively impacted by the impression that manufactured homes burn and kill, a mistaken notion spread by problematic media reports.

The administration is spreading false information and misleading information because the commission is pushing back against Kasich’s proposal,” said Williams.

The OMHC also conducts inspections of all new and previously owned manufactured home installations, resulting in less than 10 complaints in the last three years.

By comparison, 23,000 home installations have occurred in the last decade, and prior to the Commission’s existence 500-800 improper home installation complaints occurred annually.

UPDATEOMHAFiresBackinMHCommissionBattlecreditOfficialPhotosOMHAOMHCEPADigitalImagingReporter-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Gov. Kasich, official photo. Ohio EPA, OMHC, OMHA, logos, photo, credits: Digital Imaging Reporter and their respective organizations.

I urge any of your Committee to review agendas and minutes of the MH Commission meetings, to see the all-important issues that are discussed, for the benefits and safety of manufactured homeowners,” said Pojman during recent testimony.

Terminology Matters 

In a recent story on the differences between mobile and manufactured homes, MHProNews asked Urbana, Ohio Fire Chief Mark Keller to clarify details on a recent home fire reported in his town.

This fire involved a true mobile home and was not a manufactured home. I do not have the age of the mobile home available right now,” Urbana Fire Chief Mark Keller told MHProNews.

Mobile homes are inherently bad with fire conditions. They’re not really designed to withhold any kind of fire.”

Chief Keller was specific, because MHProNews directly inquired about the facts of the case, which allowed MHLivingNews to properly represent the facts of that sad incident.  But how can doing that correct-the-record once or occasionally be enough in the face of the thousands of such stories being reported a year?

Thus, Kovach argues that it responding to misleading media accounts must become the routine.  When both MHI and MHARR have said that the industry ought to be doing hundreds of thousands of new home shipments a year, the value of correctly the record should be clear.

Sloppy Journalism?

mark_weiss_mharr_pesident__mhpronews__creditMark Weiss, JD – President and CEO of the Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR) – has spoken out strongly on the matter, calling the laziness of news agencies “sloppy journalism.”

While any harm to people or property is regrettable, there is no excuse for sloppy journalism that can harm the industry and consumers. The fact is that today’s federally regulated manufactured homes are as safe or safer than other types of homes when it comes to fire, as shown by research done by the National Fire Protection Association on multiple fire safety metrics,” said Mark Weiss, JD, President CEO of MHARR.

It is therefore misleading and a disservice to readers to fail to distinguish between pre-1976 ‘mobile homes,’ said Weiss, “and today’s manufactured homes. This is why MHARR successfully demanded several years ago that the U.S. Fire Administration remove similarly misleading language from it’s website.” 

The industry and consumers need to insist on an accurate media portrayal of today’s high-quality manufactured homes,” said Weiss.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditLinkedInAndreaReichman-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Andrea Reichman. Credit: LinkedIn.

As an Industry, we are always saddened to hear of such tragedies such as the fire that occurred in Champaign County,” said OMHA Assistant Director Andrea Reichman, commenting on the Urbana fire story.

As noted by the local Fire Chief Mark Keller, the home involved was a ‘mobile home,’ which indicates the home was built prior to the 1976 HUD Code Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards,” Reichman said.

Often times such incidents are reported inaccurately, and facilitate the image that manufactured homes are not safe when nothing could be further from the truth.  Manufactured homes are no more prone to fire than homes built on-site. The 1986 national fire safety study by the Foremost Insurance Company showed that site-built homes are more than twice as likely to experience a fire than manufactured homes,” said Reichman.

Their association’s latest call to action is linked as a download, click here.

MobileHomeUpInSmokeMobileManufacturedHousingIndustryNewsMHProNewsURbanOhioMobileHomeFire420x373

This is the image tens of millions of people have about ‘mobile homes.’ The irony is, in the majority of cases, that’s precisely what they are- pre-HUD Code mobile homes. Even within the MH industry, how many realize that there’s been no mobile homes built in over 40 years? Thus proper terminology always matters. Text graphic, MHProNews, original photo, Springfield News Sun.

The Question Remains

The “burning question,” is how does the manufactured housing industry change the commonly perceived notion that all factory-built homes are the same?

Graph_of_MH_Shipments_1991-2010_courtsey_of_MHI posted MHMSM.com MHProNews.com

MHI reports that for some 2 decades, the average shipment levels of manufactured homes were about 21 percent of all single family housing starts. Today, that number is closer to 9 percent. While tragic fire stories aren’t the only causal issue of the steep decline in the industry’s total share of the new home market, they are an example of what the industry must grapple with through educational efforts that impact local markets.  Additional facts will be explored in upcoming reports in this series.

What clearly won’t work,” says publisher and consultant, L. A. ‘Tony’ Kovach is doing nothingAll too often – for decades – the industry has routinely taken the tactic of ignoring the bad news, hoping it will eventually fade away.”

A glance at industry shipments today compared to 15, 20 or 25 years ago proves that while we’ve advanced from the great recessions’ bottom,” said Kovach, “we’re nowhere near our industry’s historic percentage of new construction starts. The steady drip, drip, drip, of what Marty Lavin and others call the ‘other image campaign’ persists.  So, we as professionals must become resolute in responding routinely too.

Engaging the media is one part of the solution,” Kovach says. “Many editors are willing to make corrections when a story has a fact error.  We as trade media are and can be part of education and solution.  But that also requires engagement and support from members of the industry.”

“It’s Education”

hetMurphreeDeerValleyHomebuildersJamesMcGeeDeerValleyHomebuildersLATonyKovachInsideMH

Chet Murphree, Deer Valley Homebuilders. James McGee. Deer Valley Homebuilders, L.A. ‘Tony’ Kovach, Inside MH.

I want to thank you for what you do for this industry,” said James McGee of Deer Valley Homebuilders. “We’ve kind of zeroed around about what’s important. It’s education. I want to say, Tony, thank you for spearheading that. You’re an incredible guy, and our industry’s very lucky to have you.” 

Chet Murphree echoed McGee’s comments, with “Absolutely.” 

Kovach in turn routinely reminds people that without their writing and video team, supporters and sponsors, the news and educational efforts would not be possible. “It has to be about mutual effort – team work – that goes to the grass roots, at the local and regional levels,” he said.  “It isn’t about mountains of cash.  It’s about a wise use of time, talent and resources in responding and educating as needed.”

“As the myths and fears fade, we know from experience more customers come, see, are impressed with the value, and buy.”

Ohio is an example of where the state and both national associations – along with MHLivingNews, MHProNews – plus engaged industry members – acting in conjunction with home owners – all provided comments and made efforts to correct-the-record. As we recently reported, the outlook there is hopeful as a result.

Programming Note

With the launch of MHProNews’ newly updated home page and website, the Daily Business News will take a look in the coming days at a variety of issues that are holding our industry back from achieving and exceeding its historic potential.

Because as the myths and misconceptions subside, the sale of manufactured should skyrocket as the surprising private sector answer to the affordable housing crisis.  As McGee said, “It’s education.”

For more on manufactured housing being the affordable housing solution that’s hiding in plain sight, see the reports on the page, linked here. ##

(Image credits are as shown above, and when provided by third parties, are shared under fair use guidelines.)

RC Williams, Daily Business News MHProNewsSubmitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

 

Mobile, Manufactured Home Fire Myths go Up in Smoke

February 2nd, 2017 Comments off
MobileHomeUpInSmokeMobileManufacturedHousingIndustryNewsMHProNewsURbanOhioMobileHomeFire420x373

Text graphic, MHProNews, original photo, Springfield News Sun.

A tragic event in Champaign County, Ohio, on Monday shined a bright light on the differences between mobile and manufactured homes, and why terminology matters.

The mobile home fire left Kalleen Emmons, 23, in critical condition and Robert Garringer, 31, in serious condition. Two children were also injured.

According to the Springfield News-Sun, which did not reply to MHProNews requests for clarification on the type of home involved in the blaze, firefighters were dispatched to the scene Monday at 12:15 a.m.  There they discovered the four victims, who had already escaped from the burning home, thanks to a smoke alarm.

The four were transferred by ambulance to Springfield Regional Medical Center.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokeFireChiefMarkKellerCreditUrbanaFireDivision-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Chief Mark Keller. Official Photo.

This fire involved a true mobile home and was not a manufactured home. I do not have the age of the mobile home available right now,” Urbana Fire Chief Mark Keller told MHProNews.

 

 

Mobile homes are inherently bad with fire conditions. They’re not really designed to withhold any kind of fire.

Chief Keller said that the home was a total loss and the fire also damaged siding on the home next door.

Usually once a window is broken out, it spreads very quickly throughout the rest of the trailer [sic]. And that’s pretty much what we had happened.

manufacturedhomeNotMotorHomeNotTrailerNotMobileHome-NFPA-FARreportOnManufacturedHousingFires-posted-MHLiivingNews-com-

The NFPA clearly understands the importance of proper terminology, as the clip from their Manufactured Homes Fires report, makes clear. As an editorial point, one of many reasons that MHProNews and MHLivingNews stress the value of precise terminology is because while some older mobile homes were built to better standards, many other pre-HUD Code mobile homes were not. The HUD Code – which starting June 15, 1976 established tough federal safety, energy and construction standards – resulted in a home building process that performs dynamically as well (or better) than conventional housing for about half the cost, according to third party studies; including the NFPA.  These HUD Code homes should only be referred to in reports as a manufactured home, or manufactured housing.

UpInSmokeMobileManufacturedHousingIndustryNewsUrbanaOHfireMHProNews

Terminology Matters

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditLinkedInAndreaReichman-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Andrea Reichman. Credit: LinkedIn.

As an Industry, we are always saddened to hear of such tragedies such as the fire that occurred in Champaign County,” said Andrea Reichman, Assistant Director of the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OMHA).

 

As noted by the local Fire Chief Mark Keller, the home involved was a ‘mobile home,which indicates the home was built prior to the 1976 HUD Code Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards,” Reichman said.

Often times such incidents are reported inaccurately, and facilitate the image that manufactured homes are not safe when nothing could be further from the truth.  Manufactured homes are no more prone to fire than homes built on-site. The 1986 national fire safety study by the Foremost Insurance Company showed that site-built homes are more than twice as likely to experience a fire than manufactured homes,” said Reichman.

About 20 percent of all MH are pre-HUD Code mobile homes, so, the balance would be manufactured homes.

While many ‘mobile homes’ are replaced every day some still exist. OMHA was encouraged to hear that the home had smoke detectors that were activated during the fire. The industry encourages homeowners to install and test their smoke detectors monthly per the recommendation of the National Fire Protection Association for all residential properties,” she told MHProNews.

MobileManufacturedHomeFireMythsgoUpinSmokecreditNFPAMHLivingNews-postedtothedailybusinessnewsmhpronewsmhlivingnews

Credits: MHLivingNews, NFPA.

As Daily Business News readers are already aware, a “mobile homehas not been built in the U.S. since June 15th 1976, the day the first federally regulated manufactured homes began to the sounds of nail guns and saws in production centers from coast to coast.

National View on the MH Fire Issue

M_Mark_Weiss_MHARR_president__mhpronews__credit postedDailyBusinessNewsMHProNews

For “A Cup of Coffee With…” MHARR president and CEO M. Mark Weiss, click here or on the photo. Credit: MHProNews.

While any harm to people or property is regrettable, there is no excuse for sloppy journalism that can harm the industry and consumers. The fact is that today’s federally regulated manufactured homes are as safe or safer than other types of homes when it comes to fire, as shown by research done by the National Fire Protection Association on multiple fire safety metrics,” said M. Mark Weiss, JD, President CEO of the Manufactured Housing Association for Regulatory Reform (MHARR).

Weiss’ comments to the Daily Business News raises an important point.

Namely, that “sloppy journalism” can be harmful to the proper image and understanding of manufactured homes.  That in turn arguably harms manufactured home owner’s values.  Inaccurate media coverage also deters some would-be home buyers of manufactured housing, who might otherwise purchase one; if they realize how safe, appealing, energy-efficient, and affordable contemporary manufactured homes are.

Those lost new and pre-owned MH sales opportunities cost the industry’s businesses money, and workers better-paying job opportunities.

It is therefore misleading and a disservice to readers to fail to distinguish between pre-1976 ‘mobile homes,’ said Weiss, “and today’s manufactured homes. This is why MHARR successfully demanded several years ago that the U.S. Fire Administration remove similarly misleading language from it’s website. 

The industry and consumers need to insist on an accurate media portrayal of today’s high-quality manufactured homes,” said Weiss.

An industry wag told the Daily Business News that it’s inaccurate reporting that should go up in smoke – because compared to other forms of housing – modern manufactured homes more rarely do.  Still, prudent precautions such as smoke detectors ought to be followed, along with other safety steps reported in detail at this link here.

For more on the NFPA report on fire safety of modern manufactured home compared to conventional housing and mobile homes, click here. ##

(Image credits are as shown above.)

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RC Williams, for Daily Business News, MHProNews.

Submitted by RC Williams to the Daily Business News for MHProNews.

State MH Associations: New Face in Wis., New Address in Ohio

July 28th, 2015 Comments off

laurie mercurio  comm dir wisconsin housing allianceMHProNews has been informed by Ross Kinzler, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Housing Alliance (WHA) that his Assistant Executive Director, Amy Bliss, has hired Laurie Mercurio as their new communications director. An AMS certified meteorologist, she has been an on-air weather and news reporter at WKOW-TV in Madison, WI. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma, she is the mother of two and is married to a regional bank president. Her official duties begin Aug. 6.

In other association news, Andrea Reichman, Assistant Director of the Ohio Manufactured Homes Association (OHHA), informs MHProNews that the association has moved to a new location. The new address is 244 Bradenton Ave., Dublin, Ohio 43017. ##

(Photo credit: Wisconsin Housing Alliance-Laurie Mercurio)

matthew-silver-daily-business-news-mhpronews-comArticle submitted by Matthew J. Silver to Daily Business News-MHProNews.