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Posts Tagged ‘Mac’

Can Anyone Anywhere build the next Google?!

November 22nd, 2013 No comments

Vivek Wadhwa recently posted a column on LinkedIn with the provocative headline, Anyone, anywhere can start the next Google. Wadhwa is a “fellow” at the Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University.  Let's review some of his thoughts before commenting.

"A common excuse that entrepreneurs make for not being able to innovate is the lack of venture capital in their region. They argue that because investors are not ready to take a risk, they can’t succeed. Policy makers all over the world make the same excuse. So did legendary Indian entrepreneur Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw in a Linkedin post about “why India can’t produce a single Apple or a Google”."

"Access to venture capital may have been a problem as recently as a decade ago, but is no longer an inhibitor. The cost of developing world-changing startups has dropped dramatically. With the exponential advances in technologies such as computing, storage, and sensors, entrepreneurs can do what only governments and big research labs could do before: solve big problems."

"When Google was founded in 1998, for example, the DEC AlphaServer 8400, a minicomputer with the same processing power the iPad enjoys today, cost close to $1 million. Storage necessitated installing a server farm and rack upon rack of hard disks. It cost millions of dollars to start a technology company. Today, anyone can buy computing power and storage for practically nothing from companies such as Amazon and Google. The iPhone 5S is more powerful than the Cray supercomputers of yesteryear—which the U.S. placed tight export restrictions on. Today we carry supercomputers in our pockets and use them to check e-mail and make phone calls every now and then."

"It cost more than a billion dollars to sequence a full human genome a decade ago. It costs less than three thousand dollars to do now. Soon it will cost less than a cup of coffee. Genome data are available from millions of people already; soon this will be in the billions. Anyone anywhere can now write computer code that compares one person’s DNA with another; learn what diseases people with similar genes have had; and analyze the correspondences between genomes and the effectiveness with which different medications or other interventions have treated a given disease."

"The same advances are happening with sensor-based devices. Sensors such as those in our iPhones cost tens of thousands of dollars a few years ago but now cost practically nothing. They are allowing us to build devices to monitor our health—so that we can prevent disease and dramatically reduce health-care costs. Entrepreneurs are building iPhone apps that act like medical assistants and detect disease; smart pills that we swallow in order to monitor our internals; and body sensors that monitor heart, brain, and body activity. Sensors are also being used to monitor soil humidity, pressure in oil pipelines, and traffic patterns. These are available to Indian entrepreneurs as readily as to scientists in U.S. research labs."

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"One device that I recently tested is by Alivecor. The prototype that Alivecor gave me worked with India’s $40 Aakash tablet. It provides the same information as expensive EKG machines do, and the data can be uploaded to the cloud and analyzed by software."

"An entrepreneur I know in Chile also built a water sanitization system that can help reduce the incidence of disease caused by waterborne viruses in the developing world as well as in the developed world. Alfredo Zolezzi’s $500 Plasma Water Sanitation System does what even the most expensive water sanitization systems don’t—kills 100% of the bacteria and viruses in water. This device can help save the millions of lives that are lost because of unsanitary water. It could also earn billions in revenue. Zolezzi built this with a small team in Chile—with no venture capital."

Wadhwa narrative of modern successes goes on, but you get the point.  

Millions of professionals in all industries and careers – including tens of thousands in MH – are limiting themselves through their thoughts, words and actions.

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This is what Zig Ziglar famously and insightfully called 'cooked in a squat.' 

Do you know someone doing the same things the same as they did 10 years ago?  Chances are good, they are limiting themselves when they do so! ##

PS: Check our many Exclusive and Red Hot Featured Articles for November and see the other new stories at MHLivingNews.com too.

L. A. "Tony" KovachL. A. 'Tony' Kovach
ManufacturedHomeLivingNews.com | MHProNews.com |
Business and Public Marketing & Ads: B2B | B2C
Websites, Contract Marketing & Sales Training, Consulting, Speaking:

MHC-MD.com | LATonyKovach.com | Office 863-213-4090

Connect on LinkedIN:
http://www.linkedin.com/in/latonykovach 

Amway and Autos – Lessons in Branding, UnBranding and ReBranding for Manufactured Housing

October 13th, 2013 No comments

Perhaps the best time to write a column on branding, unbranding and rebranding is prior to the Fall Leadership forum of the National Community Council (NCC) at the Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI). Their workshop on that topic will be one of the items yours truly plans to take in with keen interest, as it is something we deal with routinely in our marketing, sales training, website building and consulting.

The Business Dictionary defines branding like this:

“The process involved in creating a unique name and image for a product in the consumers' mind, mainly through advertising campaigns with a consistent theme. Branding aims to establish a significant and differentiated presence in the market that attracts and retains loyal customers.”

Let's begin with a fundamental principle to rapidly drive home the point for today's topic.

The value of branding a product or service is dependent in part on the perception and demand of the product or service in question.

For example, autos are in demand. Branding your car company or dealership makes sense, because Ask reports that in 2011, 12,778,885 cars, trucks, SUV and other automotive types were sold in the U.S. alone. Branding your product and/or service to grow your piece of the automotive pie in such a huge market makes perfect sense.

The Free Dictionary defines rebrand as follows:

rebrand [riːˈbrænd] – (Business / Marketing) (tr) to change or update the image of (an organization or product).

As an example, if your company's brand in automotive is suffering, you'd want to consider rebranding.

Let's imagine for a moment that an import auto company like Yugo wanted to change their image, rebranding combined with improved quality controls, marketing, service and sales training could have made the kind of sense that could have saved that automaker from 'crashing and burning' in the U.S. car market.

Almost no one in our industry (besides us and some of our select clients) grasp and use the powerful concept of parallel paths and unbranding, along with when it makes sense to use this principle.

Macmillan defines unbranding as:

Unbranded goods are not marked with a name of the company that makes them.

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What if your dealership, community – or the industry at large – has an image issue? Does rebranding make the most sense? Or would a possible combination of unbranding and/or rebranding make more sense?

Before you answer, consider this fact. Manufactured housing has tumbled from having 21% of the new home starts in the last 20 years to some 8-12% in more recent years.

So rebranding in a shrinking market is like deciding to be a bigger fish in a smaller pond. Wouldn't you rather go after the large housing marketing place, by whatever strategies are necessary to get you there profitably?

Lessons from Amway and Unbranding

As an example to drive home the point, think about Amway. How many people do you know that have run out to sign up to sell or buy vitamins, home cleaning products etc. from a multi-level marketing (MLM) distributor or company?

The image of MLM in general isn't that hot and hasn't been for many years! So what does a savvy MLM distributor or company do? Answer: they teach their marketing minded distributors to avoid the company name and the marketing method in their initial contact.

In no small measure due to their dual campaign of unbranding and branding, Amway became a multi-billion dollar empire for its founders and made millions for key 'direct distributors.'

At MHC-MD.com and in part via our LATonyKovach.com – websites, marketing, training and coaching platforms – we have garnered dozens of recommendations and hundreds of endorsements by using a proper combination of branding, unbranding and rebranding, along with other proven strategies.

Which of these – branding, unbranding and re-branding – does your operation need? The answer to that question can be worth millions to you and billions to our industry. ##

PS: Check our many Exclusive and Red Hot Featured Articles for October and see the other new stories at MHLivingNews.com too.

L. A. "Tony" KovachL. A. 'Tony' Kovach
ManufacturedHomeLivingNews.com | MHProNews.com |
Business and Public Marketing & Ads: B2B | B2C
Websites, Contract Marketing & Sales Training, Consulting, Speaking:

MHC-MD.com | LATonyKovach.com | Office 863-213-4090 

Connect on LinkedIN:
http://www.linkedin.com/in/latonykovach 

Spam filling your INBOX? Get relief now

February 6th, 2011 No comments
21-day Spam Count

21-day Spam Count

One of the most annoying things we have to deal with is an avalanche of spam messages that appear in our email box every day. The illustration at left shows the number of spam email messages that came into just one of my email accounts over a recent 21-day period.

The spam filters in most email programs have improved vastly over the past few years and most of those 5,085 messages were trapped without my ever seeing them. I use Apple Mail as my client program. It’s spam filtering capabilities were always good and have improved steadily.

I also use Mozilla Thunderbird on Mac, Windows and Linux platforms. Thunderbird, while not as good as Mail, has performed pretty well.

But there were still too many spam messages getting through my filters and they were becoming a huge waste of time. I began looking for a better solution. The one I am using has performed virtually flawlessly and now catches about 98% of spam messages without filtering good messages except on rare occcasion.

The 98% Solutions

No SpamThe solution I’ve been using is SpamSieve from C-Command Software. Using a Bayesian algorithm, SpamSieve running on my desktop Mac also does an great job of keeping spam off of my iPhone. It needs a few minutes to react, updating my imap email accounts, but when it filters spam from the desktop machine and the desktop synchronizes with the server, it kills it there too. My iPhone then reflects the de-spammed version of my mailbox. I love that.

BTW, it is NOT free, but the $30 registration costs was well worth it to me. A trial version is available. Sorry, Mac only and it doesn’t work with Thunderbird at this time.

I’ve searched for a Windows version, preferably free, but the top free spam filters for Windows all seem to have shortcomings that make them pale next to SpamSieve by comparison. Nevertheless, there is a list of free Windows spam filters at About.com that might be worth looking into.

On the commercial side of the Windows scene, Spam Bully shows promise. It is built specifically for Outlook, Outlook Express and Windows Live Mail and looks like a great candidate. I haven’t tried it, but at $29.95 it compares price-wise with SpamSieve so may be worth an extra look. It has a trial version.

If you are running Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris, Mac OS X, HP-UX, AIX, RISC-OS or other *NIX OS, you may want to have a look at bogofilter, a project hosted at SourceForge. It’s free and has community support.

The 100% Solution

The ultimate spam filtering system is SpamArrest. It effectively stops 100% of spam because no one can email you without your permission. You upload your contact lists so those you trust can send you email with no interference. But when an unauthorized person or entity tries to email you, their email is stopped until you approve or reject it.

Approve and the person is added to your whitelist and is not challenged in the future. Reject them and you never hear from them again. It’s that simple.

SpamArrest has the added advantage of being fully cross-platform. It will work with any email client on any operating system (OS).

SpamArrest has a 30-day trial so you can see if it works for you. After the trial, subscriptions start as low sa $3.75 per month, a small price to pay for a spam-free mailbox.

If you’ve been plagued by spam and your email applications spam filter isn’t up to the task, try one of these solutions and set yourself free.